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New York Daily News on Chris Simms Today


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I hope he makes it, it would be nice having a UT ex as an analyst.

 

 

Chris Simms still walking in dad Phil's shoes as an NFL analyst
 

 

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Is this what America really needs? Another Simms blabbing into a football microphone?

The question does not weigh heavily on Chris Simms’ mind. He is 33 years old. He already has spent plenty of time looking miles into his future, trying to follow in some very large footsteps. Even saw them fading during the 2003 NFL Draft. With visions of being a first-round selection, he waited and got angrier. The call came in the third round from Bucs coach Jon Gruden.

Finally, Simms was gaining on those footsteps, breathing right down them, so to speak. He was going to be an NFL quarterback, just like his father Phil. The kid played in the league for eight seasons, including 2006 when he nearly died after rupturing his spleen in a game against Carolina. His football career took a hard left turn after that. Chris Simms was never the same as a football player.

The television business is politically treacherous. Still, the microphone provides a much safer environment than a football field inhabited by human missiles and rampaging lunatics.

With another NFL Draft just days away, it’s a good time to inform the free world about this: There is no Draft for broadcasters. No matter. Chris Simms looks down the road and sees those same footsteps again.

His vantage point is his platform at BleacherReport.com where he is the self-proclaimed “poor man’s GM.†Simms is evaluating teams, free agents, college players, and putting his analysis out on video for friend and foe alike, all residents of the digital world.

Those who watch him carefully, and know more than we do about prospects, suspects and rejects, say Simms is as good as any Draft guru currently working on television.

This will all play well for him if he ever lands in an NFL TV booth, a place he wants to be — just like his father. Football players can be easily judged by their performance. Broadcasting is totally subjective.

Simms knows this. He’s also aware that, just like a Joe Buck or Kenny Albert, it is perceived he is having doors open for him because his father is CBS’ No. 1 NFL analyst.

“Yeah, they think I was just given this stuff because ‘he’s Phil Simms son.’ That kind of talk only makes me more determined to succeed. It has since I was a kid,†Simms told me over the telephone. “Oh, OK they think I’m just Phil Simms’ son and that’s what they know me for? They’re wrong. I’m going to go out and score 35 points in the basketball game or strike everybody out in baseball.â€

He is reminded the broadcast business is different. You can’t impose your skill on anybody. There is no quantitative measurement of success. You can’t strike anyone out. Simms disagrees.

“No, this is no different,†Simms shoots back. “I want to prove myself. I’m competitive within myself. I’m doing all this draft and free agency stuff. I want my evaluations and all my thoughts to be accurate. I want to be proven correct in the long run.â€

He has narrowly defined his career path. When his playing days ended in 2010, Simms wanted to get into coaching. Bill Belichick hired him as a coaching assistant. During his year in New England he was offered another coaching gig. Simms figured a nomadic lifestyle wouldn’t be conducive to a traditional family life.

“I’ve got (two) young kids. I felt like my wife was becoming a single mom,†he said. “And I was going to miss out on my kids growing up.â€

That’s when he decided broadcasting would be his future. He flashed back to when he was 14 watching his father studying, preparing for a game or studio show. He knew it wasn’t as “tough†as football, but figured it wasn’t easy, either.

The realization hit last season when he did his first Pac-12 college football broadcast for Fox. It was tougher than he thought. His mouth was moving. Words were coming out. Fortunately he was talking about football.

“You listen to yourself (on a replay) a few days later and hear stuff then make corrections,†Simms said. “It was a lot like being a player.â€

Fox asked him back for the 2014 season, but he had already made up his mind. The college game is not for him. His analysis as to why provides more than a hint of his outspoken, blunt style.

“(Working a college football game) Is an incredible waste of my knowledge. It’s just not as stimulating to me,†Simms said. “The NFL is what I grew up in. It’s what I’ve always known.â€

The challenge just wasn’t there. While watching game films of college teams he would be analyzing on a fall Saturday afternoon, Simms said a team would use one defensive alignment 40 consecutive times. So, he knew what it would be doing most of the game. By comparison, he said, in the NFL on the first 10 plays there are 10 different defenses.

“And the offense lined up in 10 different formations and had 10 interesting concepts as far as pass and run games,†Simms said. “See, the NFL is more cutthroat. Everybody is being paid. Everybody is a big boy. It’s business.â€

Simms talked about recently standing next to his father. For the first time they were engaging in their “business†together, taping a segment for CBS’ NFL Draft show.

“I was nervous,†Simms said. “But as we were doing it, I was thinking I wish we could do more of this.â€

Now, they share more than just family and a profession. Listening to Chris Simms you sense he and his father share a similar commitment to their work. A similar attitude. And a similar desire to express themselves — their way.

“Dad and I are not afraid to go against the popular trend. We say what we believe is true. We are call-it-like-we-see-it type guys. As far as the NFL goes we live the game,†Simms said. “We aren’t going to sit still listening to all the (B.S.) cliches and phrases you hear throughout the media from broadcasters talking (about the) NFL. We feel we need to speak up and dispel the (garbage) that’s out there.â€

Call that Simms delivering compelling, passionate analysis. If that’s the kind of heat he can bring to an NFL TV booth. . . . hold it. He knows to do it right, he’s got to continue building a foundation and stay motivated.

“When I’m doing the videos, and the lights go on and it’s hey let’s do it,†Simms said. “It’s showtime. Let’s perform.â€

That’s all you have to hear to know he is still competing, hustling to get back to the NFL. This time it will be in a broadcast booth.

Chris Simms, once again, has those footsteps in sight.

And he’s closing in

 

 

Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/sports/raissman-chris-simms-walking-dad-phil-shoes-nfl-analyst-article-1.1778231#ixzz30mRvmkjS

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I hope he makes it, it would be nice having a UT ex as an analyst.

 

 

 

How does he look back on his UT days?  Do we know?

There were plenty of bad things said about him while he was in Austin.

At least one incident with some obnoxious UT fans that Phil has brought up.

Has anyone ever seen him just hanging out in Austin since his playing days?

SXSX?  ACL?  Spamorama?

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How does he look back on his UT days?  Do we know?

There were plenty of bad things said about him while he was in Austin.

At least one incident with some obnoxious UT fans that Phil has brought up.

Has anyone ever seen him just hanging out in Austin since his playing days?

SXSX?  ACL?  Spamorama?

 

He named his daughter Sienna. . . .which happens to be the crayola name for the color burnt orange. . .tells me how he feels about TEXAS. . . .

 

It is sad that he feels he cannot return to Austin for fear of being booed by our childish fans. . . ..sorry. . . I'm not big on being politically correct.

 

One day he'll return I hope and receive a warm welcome. . .I respect any player who left it all on the field. . . .

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i always liked Simms and thought the Applewhite love was overblown.  I think Applewhite was great, but we lost some games BADLY with him as well and Simms won a ton of games.  I don't see Applewhite as the clearly better player.  I think he got the advantage of being smaller and having less "tools" so people expected less of him whereas Simms was big and everyone wanted him to be a worldbeater.

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Really liked Simms and I feel that the "fans" that would boo him are ridiculous.  Kid has always represented Texas well to my knowledge, and he was thrust into a no-win situation by Mack & Co. 

"Fans" booed Mack at the end as well.

 

I'm not sure we know all the details on Simms vs. Applewhite. Two ultra-competitive QBs that believed they should start. What was the "no-win" situation? Maybe his dad's influence thrust him into that situation as well. 

 

Anyway, back to topic, I hope Simms succeeds as an Analyst. He seems up to the challenge and still has loads of confidence...“(Working a college football game) Is an incredible waste of my knowledge."

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i always liked Simms and thought the Applewhite love was overblown.  I think Applewhite was great, but we lost some games BADLY with him as well and Simms won a ton of games.  I don't see Applewhite as the clearly better player.  I think he got the advantage of being smaller and having less "tools" so people expected less of him whereas Simms was big and everyone wanted him to be a worldbeater.

Applewhite was good, but I wouldn't call him great.  David Ash has a better arm and can run better - but not nearly as heady as Major.  Simms was simply a better athlete than Major.  Besides, like Garrett Gilbert, Mack had made a promise to the elder Simms when he was recruiting GG.  Mack just didn't know how to develop either one.

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After a preseason game between the Bucs and the Texans in 2008 in which I was doing handheld Camera, sidelines, I had the opportunity to talk awhile with Chris just after the game before the team headed to the Buses. We talked about UT and his time there. HE brought up the CO game, not me, and said it was his biggest regret. He said he loved UT, Austin and might eventually retire there on the lakes somewhere. HE NEVER appeared bitter to me. 

 

I seemed like a class act to me.

 

He even said he had hoped to see Major on his trip to Houston since Major was supposed to be on a recruiting trip w/Saban at the time, in Houston. I remember this because I thought it odd since Bama was about to play their first game and I was pretty sure in home/ school visits weren't allowed at the time. Anyway,  that was awhile ago and I'm probably fuzzy in my memory. Point is, he didn't seem to me to hold any grudges towards Major, UT, Austin, Mack Etc.

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