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Those upset about a game in Mexico City wont like this

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<blockquote class="twitter-tweet" lang="en"><p>Texas will play the University of Washington in China in November of 2015. Going global, Bevo. <a href="https://twitter.com/search?q=%23HookEm&src=hash">#HookEm</a></p>— Justin Wells (@justinwells2424) <a href="

">March 15, 2014</a></blockquote>

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<blockquote class="twitter-tweet" lang="en"><p>Pac-12 announces <a href="https://twitter.com/search?q=%23Washington&src=hash">#Washington</a> & <a href="https://twitter.com/search?q=%23Texas&src=hash">#Texas</a> will play each other in hoops in the 1st ever major U.S. regular-season game in China in Nov, 2015.</p>— Bruce Feldman (@BFeldmanCBS) <a href="

">March 15, 2014</a></blockquote>

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Patterson is a smart man. Patterson has two jobs 1) To hire good coaches and 2) Make money for the athletic program. This is an absolutely brilliant brand move by Patterson. If you get countries like China and Mexico buying into the Longhorn brand, Patterson is about to make Texas not only rich but really rich. Expanding the Longhorn brand internationally has so much upside in terms of revenue I can't even put it into words. Patterson is a business man and he knows what he's doing. Now let's hope he knows how to hire head coaches (granted he's shown that ability at other stops).

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I don't think this compares well with the football game in Mexico City.

 

Not much of a terror threat in China, no drug cartels tied into the government, not a third world country, and has a citizenry that genuinely embraces basketball.

 

So this is hardly comparable to playing a football game in the heart of a corrupted third world country filled with a terrorism problem, IMO.

 

This is a big positive for all the reasons uitisdabomb spelled out, above.

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No comparison to the football situation. You just don't waste a prime football game against a name opponent in some other country. Basketball isn't that big of a deal. They play so many games. No biggie.

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Asia is the perfect market to hit for basketball too (specifically China). You should see how much revenue the NBA makes in China. China takes their basketball seriously. As football is a cultural thing here in America, basketball is very similar in China. Kids grow up wanting to buy the newest Nike basketball shoes. If Texas can just get a small foothold in Asia, the Longhorns can make some serious money off apparel sales alone.

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Playing hoops international is okay by me......losing a home game for football to play outside the US, don't like that idea at all. IMO.

 

Playing in China to increase branding of UT basketball, in particular when we likely have a new HC in place, is a good idea. China will enbrace the teams, the venue wil be great, and the exposure for an ascending (hopefully) BB team should be a catalyst for the 2015 season.

 

However, UT football playing USC in Mexico City is Patterson's first "jump the shark" idea IMO. Still SMH over that one…...

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...i have been to "singapore" and really enjoyed myself. therefore, i would really cherish the opportunity to follow my "horns" to china as per a basketball game. talk about monumental entertainment... bring it on!

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I usually agree with most of your posts, but you're spewing the media line on this one. I believe the media has been doing this for years to discourage tourism to Mexico and thus improve tourism in their countries. We have lived in Mexico for over 10 years. We are much safer here than we were when we lived in Houston or San Antonio. FYI, as related to Mexico City: Mexico City's murder rate is 8 per 100,000, despite being the second-largest city on the planet. That is on par with Albuquerque.

I don't think this compares well with the football game in Mexico City.

 

Not much of a terror threat in China, no drug cartels tied into the government, not a third world country, and has a citizenry that genuinely embraces basketball.

 

So this is hardly comparable to playing a football game in the heart of a corrupted third world country filled with a terrorism problem, IMO.

 

This is a big positive for all the reasons uitisdabomb spelled out, above.

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I don't think this compares well with the football game in Mexico City.

 

Not much of a terror threat in China, no drug cartels tied into the government, not a third world country, and has a citizenry that genuinely embraces basketball.

 

So this is hardly comparable to playing a football game in the heart of a corrupted third world country filled with a terrorism problem, IMO.

 

This is a big positive for all the reasons uitisdabomb spelled out, above.

 

Mexico doesn't have a terrorism problem. They have a drug war going on along the major trafficking routes. Incidences of innocent people in the Zona Rosa being gunned down by terrorists are non existent. Drug lords aren't ordering hits on American tourists in the D.F.

 

If you think the ADs of UT and USC are going to schedule a game where their alumni are going to get gunned down you need to rethink that.

 

Drug lords are businessmen. What do they gain by killing Americans in the Zona Rosa? If they have nothing to gain, they are going to put their efforts where they will generate money.

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If an American were killed in Mexico it would absolutely make the evening news. How often do you hear about Americans getting killed anywhere in Mexico, let alone in D.F.

 

How many of these do you recall seeing on the evening news?

 

 

Number of Americans killed in Mexico continues to rise

CHAPALA, MEXICO - Mexico's violence came crashing into the retirement dream of Houston's Lorraine Kulig and hundreds of other Americans last fall when gangsters shot it out and set off a bomb in this usually bucolic town on the shore of the nation's largest lake.

 

"We all know this is a gang problem. We have no connection with drugs," said Kulig, 55, who retired to the quaint small city of Chapala three years ago with her husband Michael and now helps run the Lone Star Club, a monthly gathering of Texans living in the area. "But we can be caught in the crossfire."

 

And not just crossfire.

 

In the neighboring town of Ajijic, where foreigners have been settling for decades, 69-year-old American Chris Kahr was unloading groceries from his car when a thief jumped him from behind, fired a single bullet into his chest and fled. The November murder was the third last year to strike an American from the communities along Lake Chapala in Jalisco state.

 

Last year, a record 120 Americans were killed in Mexico, compared with just 35 in 2007. Most happened in areas bordering the U.S. But for the first time, a significant number of murders occurred in previously peaceful areas like Jalisco state, where 14 Americans were killed, according to a Houston Chronicle analysis of U.S. State Department data.

 

'Heads in the sand'

 

 

The Chapala shootout and Kahr's death punctuated months of insecurity - burglaries, assaults, gangland shootouts and executions - in the area since last summer.

 

American and other foreign residents with financial and emotional commitments to their adopted homes, tend to downplay such events. But more than a few have felt rattled.

 

"We weren't seeing anything here so we all, foreigners and Mexicans alike, kind of put our heads in the sand," said writer Judy King, 67, who has lived in Ajijic for 21 years and works part time dispensing real estate and advice to foreigners looking to retire. "And now it's here."

 

As Mexico's heightened criminal violence grinds into its sixth year, Americans traveling or living in the country increasingly find themselves at risk: caught in crossfire, assaulted in their homes or on the street, targeted by criminals for a range of reasons.

 

While still miniscule compared to the more than 50,000 Mexicans claimed by the violence, the annual tally of Americans slain has risen steadily since 2007.

 

Half of last year's American homicides happened in Mexican border cities and towns - a third in Tijuana and Ciudad Juarez alone. Many involved lifelong border residents born in the United States. But the killings increasingly have occurred deep inside Mexico. The State Department issued a travel warning in February that advises U.S. citizens to avoid 14 of Mexico's 32 states and to use extreme caution when visiting four others.

 

The risks remain small given that 19.9 million Americans visited Mexico last year, and as many as 1 million U.S. citizens live there, according to U.S. government estimates.

 

Mexican gangsters aren't "going after Americans specifically in any way, either tourists or people involved in that business," said Hugo Rodriguez, head of the State Department's citizens services section for the Americas.

 

Highway shootings

 

Many U.S. citizens killed by cartel members involved cases of mistaken identity or being in the wrong place at the wrong time, he said.

 

Five teenagers were among the Americans killed or seriously wounded after being accidentally caught in cartel shootouts in hotly contested areas in Michoacan, Ciudad Juarez and Tijuana last year, Rodriguez said.

 

Others fell victim to highway robbers or illegal roadblocks in volatile states like Veracruz and Tamaulipas. A U.S. citizen and her Texas-born daughter on their way to visit relatives for Christmas were killed when gangsters sprayed a passenger bus near the Gulf port city of Tampico. And a 59-year-old Texas-based missionary was fatally shot while traveling with her husband on a highway about 70 miles south of the U.S. border.

 

'My town has changed'

 

Though not necessarily tied to the drug war, recession-related increases in crimes such as ATM robberies, home invasions and kidnappings affect Americans as well as Mexicans, said Rodriguez. Peaceful ex-pat communities like colonial San Miguel de Allende and Lake Chapala each lost longtime residents to homicide.

 

Kahr's killing came days after the break-in and brutal assault of an American woman in her Ajijic house. The incidents spurred hundreds of American, Canadians and other residents to form a community watch group and pressure officials both for arrests and for better security.

 

"I hate that my town has changed," said Realtor Linda Fossi, who moved to Ajijic 14 years ago from California. "You can't hide behind a curtain and pretend everything is fine. Things are not fine. I am devastated by it."

 

Other victims

 

In addition to Kahr, last year's American victims from the Lake Chapala area included 65-year- old retiree Allan Turnipseed, apparently shot in the head by two U.S.-born teenaged brothers that he had befriended and invited into his home. Another longtime resident, David Reitz, was killed days before Thanksgiving in Puerto Vallarta by two men from Chapala, one of whom police say had a "sentimental relationship" with the slain American.

 

Kulig, who moved from the community of Walden on Lake Houston, and many other foreign residents refuse to be daunted, reveling in the new lives they've chosen.

 

David Truly, 56, who did his doctoral research on the foreign retirees 15 years ago, added, "The types of people who come here are very adventurous. They are used to adapting."

 

http://www.chron.com/news/houston-texas/article/Number-of-Americans-killed-in-Mexico-continues-to-3518659.php

Edited by Sirhornsalot

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The wife of one of my workers was taken hostage last year after visiting her folks in Mexico.

 

For $2,500 which I loaned to him, he got her back - the second time he paid it. The first time, they took his money and kept his wife.

 

He would not go to the police or authorities about it because he was told they would kill her if he did.

 

Just think about how many of these instances go unreported.

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Playing in China to increase branding of UT basketball, in particular when we likely have a new HC in place, is a good idea. China will enbrace the teams, the venue wil be great, and the exposure for an ascending (hopefully) BB team should be a catalyst for the 2015 season.

 

However, UT football playing USC in Mexico City is Patterson's first "jump the shark" idea IMO. Still SMH over that one…...

 

We will likely not have a new basketball coach in 2015.

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Are you shitting me, I know Loraine Kulig personally and she is one of my Facebook friends. I have a whopping total of less than 30 friends and I know all of them very well. The woman you refer to got two people fired because she couldn't handle their loud radio, in her opinion, and when they returned home early several days later and these guys were in their house, the guys that she got fired killed her, It was 100% personal based upon the way she treated the workers. Please stop talking about things that you think you know when you really have no idea. If you really want a good comparison, compare crime statistics from any major city in the world with the area in question of the articles you quote for the dates mentioned and I am quite confident that Mexico will fare very well in any comparison. You don't want Texas to play anyone in Mexico, we get that, but stop picking on Mexico to make your point. I've been to a lot of events here in the last ten years plus and the Mexican government is unbelievably paranoid about possible cartel or terrorist attacks. We just had the annual Chapala Festival ( much like fiesta in San Antonio) and the military and police presence was awesome as at any other event in Mexico I have ever been to and I'm from San Antonio and the security here was far superior. The media hates Mexico and if you cannot see that, then you are a part of the brainwashed majority and have no clue what is really going on down here. I've lived here for more than ten years and am very tired of fighting the image the media is determined to saddle us with.

How many of these do you recall seeing on the evening news?

 

 

Number of Americans killed in Mexico continues to rise

CHAPALA, MEXICO - Mexico's violence came crashing into the retirement dream of Houston's Lorraine Kulig and hundreds of other Americans last fall when gangsters shot it out and set off a bomb in this usually bucolic town on the shore of the nation's largest lake.

 

"We all know this is a gang problem. We have no connection with drugs," said Kulig, 55, who retired to the quaint small city of Chapala three years ago with her husband Michael and now helps run the Lone Star Club, a monthly gathering of Texans living in the area. "But we can be caught in the crossfire."

 

And not just crossfire.

 

In the neighboring town of Ajijic, where foreigners have been settling for decades, 69-year-old American Chris Kahr was unloading groceries from his car when a thief jumped him from behind, fired a single bullet into his chest and fled. The November murder was the third last year to strike an American from the communities along Lake Chapala in Jalisco state.

 

Last year, a record 120 Americans were killed in Mexico, compared with just 35 in 2007. Most happened in areas bordering the U.S. But for the first time, a significant number of murders occurred in previously peaceful areas like Jalisco state, where 14 Americans were killed, according to a Houston Chronicle analysis of U.S. State Department data.

 

'Heads in the sand'

 

 

The Chapala shootout and Kahr's death punctuated months of insecurity - burglaries, assaults, gangland shootouts and executions - in the area since last summer.

 

American and other foreign residents with financial and emotional commitments to their adopted homes, tend to downplay such events. But more than a few have felt rattled.

 

"We weren't seeing anything here so we all, foreigners and Mexicans alike, kind of put our heads in the sand," said writer Judy King, 67, who has lived in Ajijic for 21 years and works part time dispensing real estate and advice to foreigners looking to retire. "And now it's here."

 

As Mexico's heightened criminal violence grinds into its sixth year, Americans traveling or living in the country increasingly find themselves at risk: caught in crossfire, assaulted in their homes or on the street, targeted by criminals for a range of reasons.

 

While still miniscule compared to the more than 50,000 Mexicans claimed by the violence, the annual tally of Americans slain has risen steadily since 2007.

 

Half of last year's American homicides happened in Mexican border cities and towns - a third in Tijuana and Ciudad Juarez alone. Many involved lifelong border residents born in the United States. But the killings increasingly have occurred deep inside Mexico. The State Department issued a travel warning in February that advises U.S. citizens to avoid 14 of Mexico's 32 states and to use extreme caution when visiting four others.

 

The risks remain small given that 19.9 million Americans visited Mexico last year, and as many as 1 million U.S. citizens live there, according to U.S. government estimates.

 

Mexican gangsters aren't "going after Americans specifically in any way, either tourists or people involved in that business," said Hugo Rodriguez, head of the State Department's citizens services section for the Americas.

 

Highway shootings

 

Many U.S. citizens killed by cartel members involved cases of mistaken identity or being in the wrong place at the wrong time, he said.

 

Five teenagers were among the Americans killed or seriously wounded after being accidentally caught in cartel shootouts in hotly contested areas in Michoacan, Ciudad Juarez and Tijuana last year, Rodriguez said.

 

Others fell victim to highway robbers or illegal roadblocks in volatile states like Veracruz and Tamaulipas. A U.S. citizen and her Texas-born daughter on their way to visit relatives for Christmas were killed when gangsters sprayed a passenger bus near the Gulf port city of Tampico. And a 59-year-old Texas-based missionary was fatally shot while traveling with her husband on a highway about 70 miles south of the U.S. border.

 

'My town has changed'

 

Though not necessarily tied to the drug war, recession-related increases in crimes such as ATM robberies, home invasions and kidnappings affect Americans as well as Mexicans, said Rodriguez. Peaceful ex-pat communities like colonial San Miguel de Allende and Lake Chapala each lost longtime residents to homicide.

 

Kahr's killing came days after the break-in and brutal assault of an American woman in her Ajijic house. The incidents spurred hundreds of American, Canadians and other residents to form a community watch group and pressure officials both for arrests and for better security.

 

"I hate that my town has changed," said Realtor Linda Fossi, who moved to Ajijic 14 years ago from California. "You can't hide behind a curtain and pretend everything is fine. Things are not fine. I am devastated by it."

 

Other victims

 

In addition to Kahr, last year's American victims from the Lake Chapala area included 65-year- old retiree Allan Turnipseed, apparently shot in the head by two U.S.-born teenaged brothers that he had befriended and invited into his home. Another longtime resident, David Reitz, was killed days before Thanksgiving in Puerto Vallarta by two men from Chapala, one of whom police say had a "sentimental relationship" with the slain American.

 

Kulig, who moved from the community of Walden on Lake Houston, and many other foreign residents refuse to be daunted, reveling in the new lives they've chosen.

 

David Truly, 56, who did his doctoral research on the foreign retirees 15 years ago, added, "The types of people who come here are very adventurous. They are used to adapting."

 

http://www.chron.com/news/houston-texas/article/Number-of-Americans-killed-in-Mexico-continues-to-3518659.php

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Patterson has already said Barnes will be back for the 2014-2015 season. Hard to dismiss a coach fresh off winning "Big 12 Coach of the Year" honors. But if next season provides mediocre results...Barnes might be dismissed in March 2015. That China game is supposed to occur in November, 2015. So, it IS possible we could have a different Men's BB coach in 2015.

Barnes needs to land Myles Turner to save his job, IMO.

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Patterson has already said Barnes will be back for the 2014-2015 season. Hard to dismiss a coach fresh off winning "Big 12 Coach of the Year" honors. But if next season provides mediocre results...Barnes might be dismissed in March 2015. That China game is supposed to occur in November, 2015. So, it IS possible we could have a different Men's BB coach in 2015.

Barnes needs to land Myles Turner to save his job, IMO.

 

I guess it is possible. Even though this team may well have hit a wall, there seems to be no indication that there are problems with regards to team morale. The team seems to be a pretty positive and cohesive group. They have made so much improvement this year as it stands now that I find it hard to imagine any roiling discontent boiling up between now and next year - though I guess it could happen. My outlook is based on what I am assuming will be a jump in maturity and improvement skill wise that can be expected from the existing players - which could be remarkable considering the improvement from last year to this year. Barnett seems to be the real deal as a stretch three. We have not had many of those of late. He may need a year to see more of his potential, but he offers some options that we are missing. I do not think that that alone is potential improvement that any program would not appreciate. Of course, that does not even address the potential improvement that Myles Turner would represent if he chooses to to don the Burnt Orange next year ... lot of "what if's" and "maybe's" there, but I guess I tend to look at the positive side of things. I do not have any control over any of it anyway, so I figure I might as well sleep with visions of sugar plums ... or rather of Barnett and Turner dunks swimming in my head! It just seems that that is more fun. ;)

Edited by budreaureye
poor eye hand keyboard coordination

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Mexico by and large is very dangerous, there is no disputing that. However, I have no doubt should this fiasco go down, they will have Mexico City locked down, and the boosters are going to have "contractors" in place down there. The fans might be in danger but the kids/staffs will be fine.

 

As it pertains to China, who cares, its one game of many, and its not like Texas vs Washington was going to draw 1/10th of the people to the drum it will draw in China.

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I don't think this compares well with the football game in Mexico City.

 

Not much of a terror threat in China, no drug cartels tied into the government, not a third world country, and has a citizenry that genuinely embraces basketball.

 

So this is hardly comparable to playing a football game in the heart of a corrupted third world country filled with a terrorism problem, IMO.

 

This is a big positive for all the reasons uitisdabomb spelled out, above.

 

Brother I couldn't agree with you more! Mexico City is a safety risk, and for what? A country that has no great interest in American football, only in American money. So our fans travel to Mexico City and risk it all? Being robbed raped kidnapped murdered? It's a terrible idea and one that doesn't make any sense to me.

 

Basketball in china on the other hand does make some sense. Basketball is huge over there

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