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Recruiting Updates


HornEsch
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<blockquote class="twitter-tweet" lang="en"><p>Sione and Maea Teuhema currently visiting LSU. Hearing they love the academics there. Still committed to Texas for now.</p>— Max Olson (@max_olson) <a onclick="_gaq.push(['_trackEvent', 'Outgoing', 'twitter.com', '/max_olson/statuses/429799505836658688']);" href="
">February 2, 2014</a></blockquote>

<script async src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

 

This week in sports we learned that LSU and Arkansas have impressive academics.

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Academics as a factor for athletes usually isn't about how prestigious the school is from that standpoint. Texas Tech used to sell academics based on a high graduation rate for athletes. However, LSU has lost so many underclassmen to the draft recently that I don't see that pitch being true for them. Also, athletes love being told that there is a strong support system to help them with school (i.e. tutors, relationships of AD to their perspective colleges' admin and professors, etc.).

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Academics as a factor for athletes......

 

 

Some schools even let their student athletes take their classes "online" so that they do not have to set foot on campus other than for activities directly related to their sport.

 

Can you believe that nonsense?

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This is supposed to be the list of recruits in Austin this weekend --

 

Jerrod Heard, D'onta Foreman, Armanti Foreman, Roderick Bernard, Lorenzo Joe, Jake McMillon, Cameron Hampton and John Bonney.

Arrion Springs is rumored to be there as well and this has not been contradicted yet.

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To date I have not said a word about online classes, but since I have had experience with 2 myself, post-grad, I can verify that the learning experience is very unsatisfactory. It does not compare to a classroom setting, and that assumes that the student is actually the one doing the work. All of the mainstays of education are thrown out, and it is simply a means to an end - credit.

 

I see it as an isolating, insulating tool that only serves a purpose for distance learning, or for a post-grad 'filler'. It should not take the place of the classroom experience for student athletes who are on scholarship.

 

Isn't this part of our illustrious governor's plan to dumb down and cheap down our educational system?

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It is legal and not morally wrong folks. You can continue to harp on this, but it is a lot more common than you think. In fact, I was informed by a Longhorn buddy of mine that talks to Duke Thomas and Marcus Johnson and he said they only had one class on campus during the fall. Also, your boy Strong sure didn't have any problems with Bridgewater doing it this last fall, nor did Clemson with Tajh Boyd. I don't have any qualms about doing it and ya'll shouldn't either. I loaded up on online classes one semester when I was in college so that I could work a more open schedule and save money on gas (drove 30 miles to class).

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<blockquote class="twitter-tweet" lang="en"><p>Huge news for <a href="https://twitter.com/search?q=%23PonyUp&src=hash">#PonyUp</a> fans. RB/FB Daniel Gresham (<a href="https://twitter.com/DanielGresham33">@DanielGresham33</a>) has committed to <a href="https://twitter.com/search?q=%23SMU&src=hash">#SMU</a>. He's the program's 1st 4-star pledge since 2012.</p>— Damon Sayles (@DamonSayles) <a href="

">February 2, 2014</a></blockquote>

<script async src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

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It is ...... not morally wrong folks. .

 

 

One thing I have learned about aggies over the years is that their idea about what is moral depends wholly upon whether they are the perpetrator of the conduct in question or whether they sitting in judgment of the actions of a non-aggy. I call it "situational ethics."

 

In this case, to extend the debate to its logical extreme -- the question is whether it would be "moral" for an aggy football player to receive a full scholarship to attend A&M if he took all his classes online and otherwise were to never step foot on campus except to play football.

 

As you have shown, aggies would say yes. (And even YES! if he were a starter).

My guess is that most of the rest of the country would disagree.

And my further guess is that the aggy group moral would change if all the facts were the same except that the player were at Arkansas or UH.

Edited by Juan Grande
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It is legal and not morally wrong folks. You can continue to harp on this, but it is a lot more common than you think. In fact, I was informed by a Longhorn buddy of mine that talks to Duke Thomas and Marcus Johnson and he said they only had one class on campus during the fall. Also, your boy Strong sure didn't have any problems with Bridgewater doing it this last fall, nor did Clemson with Tajh Boyd. I don't have any qualms about doing it and ya'll shouldn't either. I loaded up on online classes one semester when I was in college so that I could work a more open schedule and save money on gas (drove 30 miles to class).

 

I honestly don't know how to think or feel about the online classes. I guess it depends on how the online class is facilitated. Is it on live 'webcam' or some other technology? We didn't have this luxury when I graduated from UT back in the dark ages.

 

For me, it defeats the purpose of being a college student. You miss out on the dialogue and interaction with teachers, GA's, classmates, etc. You're definitely not taking advantage of the whole experience.

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Would it be moral for a student to do the same? As long as it fits the necessary requirements for graduation then yes, it is moral. These are taken on a semester-by-semester basis from my understanding and is most often used when the student-athlete has multiple choices for which courses to take. Hint: G-stud and other weak majors tend to have more options for what to take and allow much more flexibility within their programs. Please go tell other students, not just student-athletes that they are immoral for taking more efficient, legal options for their schooling. Is one immoral for less challenging classes with easier professors? Where are you willing to draw the line between moral/immoral?

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It is legal and not morally wrong folks. You can continue to harp on this, but it is a lot more common than you think. In fact, I was informed by a Longhorn buddy of mine that talks to Duke Thomas and Marcus Johnson and he said they only had one class on campus during the fall. Also, your boy Strong sure didn't have any problems with Bridgewater doing it this last fall, nor did Clemson with Tajh Boyd. I don't have any qualms about doing it and ya'll shouldn't either. I loaded up on online classes one semester when I was in college so that I could work a more open schedule and save money on gas (drove 30 miles to class).

 

Important question(s): if a course is being taught on campus but also as an online course, would the person doing it online have to take the SAME tests/exams, turn in (by email, I suppose, and ON TIME) the same homework assignments and (most importantly), finish the class in one semester (like its on-campus counterpart)?? If the answer to all these questions is YES, there would (still) be no guarantee that the athlete actually took the online class, did the homework, quizzes, exams, etc HIMSELF (i.e. there wasn't a ringer doing all this for him).

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There is a valid argument as to the academic value of online courses (they are meant for ease) but this just doesn't equate as to the question of whether one is wrong for taking them.This statement sums up my views on online classes as well: "You miss out on the dialogue and interaction with teachers, GA's, classmates, etc. You're definitely not taking advantage of the whole experience." However, these classes are available, and to label someone as immoral and dismiss them on an academic level isn't right and frankly reeks of arrogance.

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Would it be moral for a student to do the same? As long as it fits the necessary requirements for graduation then yes, it is moral. These are taken on a semester-by-semester basis from my understanding and is most often used when the student-athlete has multiple choices for which courses to take. ......

 

You remind me of one of the few aggie athletes who was honest about the academic rigor there for players.

 

Former Texas A&M star Antoine Wright ..... [told] Bob Costas on .... HBO's "Costas Now" that he received a better education in high school than in college.

 

"Once I got to college, I kind of let my hair down a little bit," Wright says. "I don't have to write term papers any more — I just have to get a grade now and play basketball."

 

Costas: "Tell me what it was like in these agriculture classes [at A&M]."

 

Wright: "In certain classes you see, you know, a quarterback, me, a running back, and then a farmer. So, it definitely was a little bizarre. But, we're all in poultry science for a reason. We're in this class because we need to get this grade. We're not really trying to learn about chickens."

 

Costas: "You took one course in floral design. What was that like?"

 

Wright: "It's not as easy as it sounds, to be honest with you. But they put me in there with a couple of athletes. You're gonna ask me a question about floral design — I can't answer it because I needed a grade."

 

 

Do you know if the animal husbandry and floral design classes are already offered online?

 

Seems like it would be tough to learn how to determine the gender of a baby chick without actually touching it, but what do I know?

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There is a valid argument as to the academic value of online courses (they are meant for ease) but this just doesn't equate as to the question of whether one is wrong for taking them.This statement sums up my views on online classes as well: "You miss out on the dialogue and interaction with teachers, GA's, classmates, etc. You're definitely not taking advantage of the whole experience." However, these classes are available, and to label someone as immoral and dismiss them on an academic level isn't right and frankly reeks of arrogance.

 

The only moral question for me is whether or not the student in question is actually completing the work himself. Otherwise, there's nothing wrong with it from a moral perspective. Academically, that's another argument.

 

Arrogance? HornSports is a website & forum for Texas-Exes, UT students, and Longhorns fans ("t-shirt fan" in aggy parlance). Maybe you've heard that we're a little prideful? Lucky for the aggies y'all don't have to deal with us any longer.

 

And yet.....here you are. :D

Edited by J.B. TexasEx
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I know the Aggie Honor code is fake but this is just such a stupid thing to debate. If Texas were doing it i'd acknowledge that it was a tactic to allow the athlete to coast by (or outright cheat). You not admitting that that is what's intended is the only arrogant thing i see about this argument. It's very SEC and very un-honor code of you to pretend that it is something it isn't.

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"Reeks of arrogance"

 

Seriously? What's the point of attending a great university if you're going to be taking on-line classes? That reeks of stupidity. I didn't know it was arrogant to actually care about your education, but that's the typical jab at "elitist" schools.

 

Crap like this is what UNC is trying to cover up (quite poorly).

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How did online classes become the boogieman here?

 

They are and have been present at every school in the country. They'll continue to be useful for athletes due to the need for flexibility in schedule.

 

It's nether a recruiting advantage nor disadvantage to have/not have them available.

 

What a joke. Why not just be honest about this. A&M is using online classes to fast track kids with minimal to zero supervision and little to no effort. You guys are embarrassing yourselves by arguing otherwise. Take that crap to an Aggie board because they'll eat it up. All of a sudden you guys are huge proponents of online classes? It's a tactic and you'd serve yourself and your honor code well by admitting it.

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  • 2021 Texas Football Schedule

    Week
    Opponent
    W/L
    9/4
    Louisiana
    W 38-18
    9/11
    @Arkansas
    L 21-40
    9/18
    Rice
    W 58-0
    9/25
    Texas Tech
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    Oklahoma
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    @Iowa State
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    11/27
    Kansas State
    W 22-17

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