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March Sadness – Recovering from a Storm for the Ages


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A Pittisporum hedge, probably 20 years old, dying from the winter storm. March Sadness – Winter storm leaves us reeling into March We all know the unfortunate effects of the recent, historic

Sharing a photo a reader sent to me, asking me if this was an insect of some kind. Answer – Sapsucker Woodpecker. You will note how the holes do not go all the way around the tree, to avoid

Damn good read.

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Hey DFW peeps, if you lost Palms during the winter storm, better find replacements quick. I deal with the main wholesale nursery in DFW and they told me today after this week, they may not have any more Palms until end of season or even next year. Huge demand as the storm pretty much took about 95-97% of the Palms here.

Stock of Indian Hawthorns, Lorapetalums, and Pittisporums will also be stretched to the max.

Get what you need while you can. Do not wait.

 

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12 hours ago, Sirhornsalot said:

Hey DFW peeps, if you lost Palms during the winter storm, better find replacements quick. I deal with the main wholesale nursery in DFW and they told me today after this week, they may not have any more Palms until end of season or even next year. Huge demand as the storm pretty much took about 95-97% of the Palms here.

Stock of Indian Hawthorns, Lorapetalums, and Pittisporums will also be stretched to the max.

Get what you need while you can. Do not wait.

 

Why do people get Palms north of central Texas?  I have lived in my house here in Killeen for over 20 yrs and my neighbor has replaced his palms around three times over that span.  I asked him the other day, why do you keep planting palms, something that is not well adaptive to this area, and he said that he is not replanting them this time.  Over the same time span, my trees keep growing bigger and more majestic.  Down the street a church (that sponsors starbucks coffee on their digital sign.  hahaha smh) has a whole row of palms out by the street that look terrible.  I dont get it.  They dont provide shade, or fruit, or nuts, or seeds and require care - just dont get it. 

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5 hours ago, Soldierhorn said:

Why do people get Palms north of central Texas?  I have lived in my house here in Killeen for over 20 yrs and my neighbor has replaced his palms around three times over that span.  I asked him the other day, why do you keep planting palms, something that is not well adaptive to this area, and he said that he is not replanting them this time.  Over the same time span, my trees keep growing bigger and more majestic.  Down the street a church (that sponsors starbucks coffee on their digital sign.  hahaha smh) has a whole row of palms out by the street that look terrible.  I dont get it.  They dont provide shade, or fruit, or nuts, or seeds and require care - just dont get it. 

During normal winters, we're able to prepare them for winter and they make it through fine. We have some 30-ft Palms around here, which means they've been in the ground for some time.

They are preferred around pools because they provide a tropical look and don't dump stuff in the pool.

 

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On 3/26/2021 at 2:25 PM, Sirhornsalot said:

During normal winters, we're able to prepare them for winter and they make it through fine. We have some 30-ft Palms around here, which means they've been in the ground for some time.

They are preferred around pools because they provide a tropical look and don't dump stuff in the pool.

 

agree. We can always find exceptions but planting native or adaptive plants increases your odds and cut down on the work necessary considerably. 

A neighbor asked why my yard looked so good (I dont think it looks that good) when they hardly ever see me working on it?  I told her that I go out of my way to plant native or well adaptive plants and I really dont have to do anything once they are established except keeping them trimmed or contained for the most part;. What started the conversation was she asked how I get such brilliant bluebonnets and irises blooming out by the road (where it is hard to get anything to look nice).  Stating the obvious (since most people in the Ft hood area are not native Texans), I told her that bluebonnets are native and grow in poor conditions.  I seeded them twenty years ago and they reseed themselves every year and I just mow over the many that grow outside the designated area.  I told her that when the bluebonnets dry up (and I harvest the seeds for other people), the Lantanas will bloom until late fall.  As stated earlier, once established, planting native/adaptive plants is really just about controlling them.

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1 hour ago, Soldierhorn said:

agree. We can always find exceptions but planting native or adaptive plants increases your odds and cut down on the work necessary considerably. 

A neighbor asked why my yard looked so good (I dont think it looks that good) when they hardly ever see me working on it?  I told her that I go out of my way to plant native or well adaptive plants and I really dont have to do anything once they are established except keeping them trimmed or contained for the most part;. What started the conversation was she asked how I get such brilliant bluebonnets and irises blooming out by the road (where it is hard to get anything to look nice).  Stating the obvious (since most people in the Ft hood area are not native Texans), I told her that bluebonnets are native and grow in poor conditions.  I seeded them twenty years ago and they reseed themselves every year and I just mow over the many that grow outside the designated area.  I told her that when the bluebonnets dry up (and I harvest the seeds for other people), the Lantanas will bloom until late fall.  As stated earlier, once established, planting native/adaptive plants is really just about controlling them.

Thats true, but there are also plants that are native to places with climates just like Texas. So they perform very well here. Plumbago is a fine example. Beautiful blue blooms, clustered. These guys are from Australia in areas with climate similar to Texas. They work very well in places like Austin, San Antonio, etc., because they love our long sunny days and heat.

plumbago.thumb.jpg.ffcf0793d7026bbc8b732a8c244a443e.jpg

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yeah, that's why I mentioned "adaptive" plants.  For instance, you would think crape myrtles were native because they are everywhere. they arent native but they do great in central Texas, so much so, I dig up the runners and put them in pots so I can give them away.  

wow, Plumbago looks fantastic.  I'm going to have to try that out by the mail box. My standard is that if it can grow out by the street/mailbox with minimal care, then it's a truly adaptive plant for my yard.  I like the way it looks and the color scheme is perfect

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