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September Landscapes – Installing Winter Rye!


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If you're thinking of having winter rye this year, start planning now! September is the month you would want to either install or prepare to install a winter rye turf for the cold season. Such an

Fellas, want to thank you for your participation thus far. Thanks to you, this thread is hotter than the Recruiting thread, the Longhorn discussion thread and the politics thread. For a moment in

yeah, it's time to restore the old house on the hill country property and get out of the cookie cutter city dwellers way.  The city council is on this "beautification" (revenue generating) kick and wa

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11 minutes ago, longhorndon said:

Any suggestions about eradicating chinaberry trees? My mom has some land near Lake Belton and they seem to grow like weeds.

man, aint that the truth.  When I bought my hill country property I cut down numerous giant chinaberry trees at least two feet in diameter.  They are everywhere in the hill country esp near creeks and ponds. They are almost as bad as mountain cedars.  Just cutting down those type of trees, I can see through my property and do something manageable.  The chinaberry trees we cut down in the summer ALREADY have sprigs almost 5 feet high so I'm going to have to cut them again later.  

Other than constantly cutting, i dont know what the solution is.  I saw one video where a guy cut one inch holes in the stump and packed the holes with salt. he insisted that it worked.  I wonder if you alternate filling the holes with salt and 20% vinegar?  I dont know

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1 hour ago, Soldierhorn said:

ok, good to know.  I'm going to have to protect them.  

I have some plants that look like a cross between an onion and garlic. they are not very big and they have pinkish flowers when they bloom.  I dont know if they are edible or not.  I have an old ice cooler that the lid came off and I filled it with dirt/compost and put them in that a while back. I could put the succulents between the coolers for now but raised up to get sun

Wild onion? Texas is a great home to wild onion. They are everywhere. You could probably eat them but I wouldn't, particularly when you have better options.

You could put a poultry-wire cage around those succulents. Would have to be fairly high though.

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Just now, longhorndon said:

HaHa...  We've cut every single one of them at least once!  They keep coming back...  Any ideas on ways to kill the root system?

When you cut each one, either 1) Spray the immediate root area with RoundUp, or 2) leave a pile of salt on top. Salt kills everything. Of course, the deer may eat the salt before you're able to kill off the roots. lol

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1 hour ago, Soldierhorn said:

man, aint that the truth.  When I bought my hill country property I cut down numerous giant chinaberry trees at least two feet in diameter.  They are everywhere in the hill country esp near creeks and ponds. They are almost as bad as mountain cedars.  Just cutting down those type of trees, I can see through my property and do something manageable.  The chinaberry trees we cut down in the summer ALREADY have sprigs almost 5 feet high so I'm going to have to cut them again later.  

Other than constantly cutting, i dont know what the solution is.  I saw one video where a guy cut one inch holes in the stump and packed the holes with salt. he insisted that it worked.  I wonder if you alternate filling the holes with salt and 20% vinegar?  I dont know

Forget the vinegar, you don't need it. The salt will kill it.

If have stumps from the cutting, simply drill a few holes in the stump and like your friend said, pack them with salt. You could also make cross cut grooves on the stump with a chainsaw and pack the grooves.

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19 hours ago, Sirhornsalot said:

When you cut each one, either 1) Spray the immediate root area with RoundUp, or 2) leave a pile of salt on top. Salt kills everything. Of course, the deer may eat the salt before you're able to kill off the roots. lol

I'm asking because I dont know: is glyphosate (roundup main ingredient) safe to use near to creeks and ponds?

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On 9/18/2020 at 11:53 PM, Soldierhorn said:

I'm asking because I dont know: is glyphosate (roundup main ingredient) safe to use near to creeks and ponds?

Yes, but you would want to make sure there is no rain in the forecast before you use it. It will break down into other, more harmless form within 24 hours of exposure to the elements. I like to have a larger window of time, though.

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On 9/20/2020 at 1:01 PM, Sirhornsalot said:

Yes, but you would want to make sure there is no rain in the forecast before you use it. It will break down into other, more harmless form within 24 hours of exposure to the elements. I like to have a larger window of time, though.

good to know.  In the past I have drilled holes in stumps and poured Roundup gel into the holes. it didnt seem to have much effect

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You know what would be nice?  a plant/insect identification thread.  I put three plant identification apps on my phone and each one is not helpful at all.  I took snapshots of plants that I knew what they were and the apps only got about 1 out of 10 or 12 right. And, even then some of the results were so generic that it really didnt help.  "I know it's a grape vine!  what type of grape vine!"  

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1 hour ago, Soldierhorn said:

You know what would be nice?  a plant/insect identification thread.  I put three plant identification apps on my phone and each one is not helpful at all.  I took snapshots of plants that I knew what they were and the apps only got about 1 out of 10 or 12 right. And, even then some of the results were so generic that it really didnt help.  "I know it's a grape vine!  what type of grape vine!"  

This IS an ongoing plant ID thread. You can always post a photo here of something you want ID'd.

The type of grape vine will usually be determined by where it's growing.

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1 minute ago, Sirhornsalot said:

This IS an ongoing plant ID thread. You can always post a photo here of something you want ID'd.

The type of grape vine will usually be determined by where it's growing.

good. I'll start doing that. I have some of Howard Garrett's older books (Texas insects, Texas trees, etc) and they help but it seems to be hard to find what I'm looking for.

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1 hour ago, Sirhornsalot said:

Howard Garrett is a good guy, I enjoy his shows.

20 yrs ago or so they use to play his radio show on the local AM station out of Temple but they quit doing that about 15 yrs ago.  I dont always agree with him but I'll try the natural way first and see if it works.  

We are getting some good slow rain here in central Texas.  For those that dont know, this is the PERFECT time to kill ants. They will build mounds to get the eggs out of the ground so they dont mildew.  drench the mound with an 1/2-1 gal orange oil mixture (and plant food, citrus dish soap, ammonia or anything else you want to add).  If you dont get the queen, you'll at least kill generations of ants. Often the first application kills the mound and is all that is needed.  

Edited to add: in between the bouts of rainfall, I walked around the yard and home foundation.  I found only one small ant mound being built and it was near the exterior fence. that happens when ant colonies come from the neighbor's yards.  I already had a solution ready-made and poured about third gallon on the mound.  I'm confident that is all I will have to do to that colony.  From my experience, I will sometimes see a new colony being started about 2 ft away from the drenched colony.  I dont think that means the queen is in the second colony but, more likely, the workers are trying to get something made for the queen to get into.  It doesnt really matter, I will drench the second mound as well and that almost always ends that colony. Only once or twice in the last 10 yrs or so have I seen a third colony attempt but an attempt is about all that it is.

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1 hour ago, Soldierhorn said:

20 yrs ago or so they use to play his radio show on the local AM station out of Temple but they quit doing that about 15 yrs ago.  I dont always agree with him but I'll try the natural way first and see if it works.  

We are getting some good slow rain here in central Texas.  For those that dont know, this is the PERFECT time to kill ants. They will build mounds to get the eggs out of the ground so they dont mildew.  drench the mound with an 1/2-1 gal orange oil mixture (and plant food, citrus dish soap, ammonia or anything else you want to add).  If you dont get the queen, you'll at least kill generations of ants. Often the first application kills the mound and is all that is needed.  

Edited to add: in between the bouts of rainfall, I walked around the yard and home foundation.  I found only one small ant mound being built and it was near the exterior fence. that happens when ant colonies come from the neighbor's yards.  I already had a solution ready-made and poured about third gallon on the mound.  I'm confident that is all I will have to do to that colony.  From my experience, I will sometimes see a new colony being started about 2 ft away from the drenched colony.  I dont think that means the queen is in the second colony but, more likely, the workers are trying to get something made for the queen to get into.  It doesnt really matter, I will drench the second mound as well and that almost always ends that colony. Only once or twice in the last 10 yrs or so have I seen a third colony attempt but an attempt is about all that it is.

 

I haven't seen a single ant in my yard. That is probably because I treated for chinch bugs in late August and probably killed all the insects there was.

I do use the orange oil. I keep a generic spray bottle filled with a 1 part Orange Oil and 9 parts water mixed. I even use it in the house because it smells good.

Thanks for the tips on the ants!

 

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5 minutes ago, Sirhornsalot said:

By the way, if you have ferns around your property . . . use some of that "Garrett Juice" diluted with water and pour around the base of those ferns. They love the stuff. Only do it in warm weather, too.

 

good tip. he use to recommend using his "garrett juice" as his base treatment for trees as well. 

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10 minutes ago, Sirhornsalot said:

 

I haven't seen a single ant in my yard. That is probably because I treated for chinch bugs in late August and probably killed all the insects there was.

I dont think I've seen any chinch bugs on my bermuda or buffalo grass. Do chinch bugs mostly feed off of broad leaf grasses such as St Augustine, fescue, rye, etc?

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