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Kansas State vs. Texas Film Review (Oct. 24, 2015)


Ryan Bridges
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Tyrone Swoopes' touchdowns aren't as interesting as this one, so we'll start here. 

 

HonoredGrotesqueFritillarybutterfly.gif

 

What I like: It's Cover 0. I think the second-biggest reason the defense has been better the past two games is the move toward more man coverage. (The biggest reason for the improvement is the better play of the defensive line, some of which has to do with the scheme shift but there also seems to have been an attitude change.) Playing man lets Texas get the freshmen on the field — the fact that that's a good thing says a lot.

 

What I don't like: When the receivers are close together like this, the DBs can't align at the same depth. It makes it too easy to get a rub, just like this. With this alignment, it wouldn't matter who Texas had in at safety.

This is a game film study that happens in the film room. This has to have been seen before at some point during the year that Texas aligns to THIS FORMATION IN THE RED ZONE in ZERO, WHILE BRINGING 7 AND COVERING WITH 4. Thus, the reason they get picked. Bad alignments HAD to have been seen before. Why? Because this is a rhythm throw on the 3rd step. The QB is "spot" throwing where he expects the receiver to be on his throw, since there is NO read because it's straight up man coverage.

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One play after KSU was gifted a first down on 3rd & 3, they smartly took this shot downfield. Texas is still playing Cover 1.

 

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The problem is Holton Hill peaks in the backfield at the break. The receiver is still running away from you after the break. Now the receiver has separation and you're looking for the ball, but the quarterback isn't throwing to you. The result is Hill is surprised when the receiver cuts back and he grabs him.

True on your analysis, however I will say that sometimes the other team wins too! This is a double move post corner, with the receiver running a very good, if not darn near perfect route...Guys, covering that route when run like this, is very difficult even for NFLer's!!!

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There was a bizarre coverage bust on the two-point conversion attempt after Kansas State's touchdown.

 

GentleHiddenAlligatorsnappingturtle.gif

 

At the start it looks like it's just going to be Cover 0. If so, you might expect Hall to follow the slot who motions across the formation. That seems to be the first point of confusion:

  1. Hall seems confident he's doing the right thing, but is that Kansas State receiver none of us can name so dangerous that Hill and Hall need to double him?
  2. Haines looks inside and gestures like he's expecting someone to react.
  3. At the last moment, Jinkens "oh ****s" his way over.

I have no idea what they're trying to do, but they're still OK. Just double the single receiver (for some reason), the linebackers can work off the back and man up the trips. Except then we reach the second point of confusion:

  1. Haines thinks they're playing straight man like they did on the touchdown (and like they've done every time I can remember).
  2. John Bonney thinks they're using a "banjo" technique on the receivers, so he takes the first receiver outside — who happens to also be the guy Haines is covering.

Once Bonney realizes Haines is covering that guy, Bonney sits down and plays zone. It looks like that receiver is Hubener's first read. His second read is Bonney's guy, who would be uncovered were it not for Jinkens. The back still comes open because Jinkens is no longer around to cover him. 

 

The whole play is really weird. This is just my best guess about it. 

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We're into the third quarter now and guess what Texas opens with. Back and tight end on the same side, jet motion to that side — what does that tell you? If you said jet sweep, you'd be correct.

 

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Texas is trying to give a different look, using an in-line tight end instead of a fullback, but it sets up for the same play — and removes the possibility of the Counter H going the opposite way (you could still run Counter Trey, but Texas hasn't run that so let's not worry about it).

 

Notice what KSU does. They're ready for the sweep and blitz the corner right at it. 

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Everyone on the same side with no motion so I'd normally guess Counter, except Bluiett is lined up wider, not as a fullback. That suggests he's getting out there to seal the edge for a sprintout. But if you've scouted Texas, you know they also like their Sprint Draw.

 

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It's not a bad call, and it looks like it would have worked had Perkins not blocked the wrong linebacker.

 

A brief rant, piggybacking off some of the comments by Eric Nahlin over at Inside Texas: The first thing fans complain about on offense is usually play calling. Play callers are certainly not all equal, but the complaint is usually overblown. By the time you reach the level these guys are at, you were able to convince a lot of people who know what they're doing that you knew what you're doing. 

 

This play is a good example. The casual fan wants to know why Texas would run a draw that KSU obviously had sniffed out ("they had a guy right there for the tackle!") on 3rd & 10. What I hope is clear is that (1) Texas wanted to run the ball because the weather sucked and they didn't think they needed to risk passing to win; (2) Texas went with a play they like and trust that fit the situation; (3) that play was probably going to yield a first down except one player didn't execute his block. 

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No particular Xs and Os comment except that this isn't the first time KSU has run this switch release verticals concept. What I wanted to point out here is how, even though he messes up a little in coverage, Holton Hill changes direction quicker on a wet field than most athletes could on a dry one. The guy is incredible.

 

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I had to make the lines thinner and oversimplify, but this is Bonney's sack on 3rd & 10. 

 

QuestionableAjarGoat.gif

 

So far Texas has switched to more zone coverage in the second half, including a couple of zone blitzes like this one. Bonney doesn't time this well — it's a coverage sack, really — but whatever works. 

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There was a bizarre coverage bust on the two-point conversion attempt after Kansas State's touchdown.

 

GentleHiddenAlligatorsnappingturtle.gif

 

At the start it looks like it's just going to be Cover 0. If so, you might expect Hall to follow the slot who motions across the formation. That seems to be the first point of confusion:

  1. Hall seems confident he's doing the right thing, but is that Kansas State receiver none of us can name so dangerous that Hill and Hall need to double him?
  2. Haines looks inside and gestures like he's expecting someone to react.
  3. At the last moment, Jinkens "oh ****s" his way over.

I have no idea what they're trying to do, but they're still OK. Just double the single receiver (for some reason), the linebackers can work off the back and man up the trips. Except then we reach the second point of confusion:

  1. Haines thinks they're playing straight man like they did on the touchdown (and like they've done every time I can remember).
  2. John Bonney thinks they're using a "banjo" technique on the receivers, so he takes the first receiver outside — who happens to also be the guy Haines is covering.

Once Bonney realizes Haines is covering that guy, Bonney sits down and plays zone. It looks like that receiver is Hubener's first read. His second read is Bonney's guy, who would be uncovered were it not for Jinkens. The back still comes open because Jinkens is no longer around to cover him. 

 

The whole play is really weird. This is just my best guess about it. 

Great analysis, but this is so much simpler than all the explanations....Bottom line - The D-line doesn't get there!!!!  This is a quick game throw. However, the QB buys more time. I'd say he has close to 5 seconds. At the end of the day, most QB's can find someone open if they have this much time..This is on the D-line!! EVEN if the QB did't complete the pass.

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OK, it's happened enough times now that I can confidently say Texas' DBs are having trouble handling switch releases. It's an important thing to watch going forward. 

 

SpryCleverIndianrockpython.gif

 

I'm pretty sure this is Bonney's cover bust. It doesn't make sense for Hill to chase No. 1 underneath. 

 

On a side note, I don't know what Davante Davis is doing up there on the top. I've seen him do this a few times, including against TCU when Josh Doctson caught an easy pass down the sideline. He doesn't have safety help, but it's like he thinks if the quarterback doesn't look to his side he doesn't have to cover.

 

And a last thing. I saw some people complaining on Twitter about Texas "not covering the No. 3 receiver" in the second half. It started I think because the announcers stupidly highlighted a look like this and said Texas was playing 2-on-3. I hope this diagram convinces you that that wasn't true.

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Great analysis, but this is so much simpler than all the explanations....Bottom line - The D-line doesn't get there!!!!  This is a quick game throw. However, the QB buys more time. I'd say he has close to 5 seconds. At the end of the day, most QB's can find someone open if they have this much time..This is on the D-line!! EVEN if the QB did't complete the pass.

 

Hey, good to have you back! I checked — 4.55 seconds from snap to release. Good call.

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This was a big play that had the potential to be even bigger. KSU scored to end the half and was down by only 10 midway through the third quarter. They had a 3rd & 5 at the Texas 19.

 

KSU expects man coverage so they motion to a stacked look (easy pick, and the defense can't jam both receivers) and run a "mesh" concept, where receivers from opposite sides run crossing routes past each other. 

 

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They guessed right. Texas is, in fact, in man coverage, playing Cover 1 Robber. But Hill is no ordinary freshman; he sees the other crosser coming and avoids him, staying in great position to play the intended receiver. Not only that, but the robber, Haines, also sees what's coming, reads Hubener's eyes and jumps the route. Had the ball not gone through his hands he would have scored.

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Norvell is throwing out new stuff now. I don't think Texas has used this exact formation with the jet motion so far in this game, but just based on the alignment of the backs I was expecting Lead Zone. I was close, but it's Lead Outside Zone Read. Don't worry too much about the diagram in the first gif; there's a second one that's a little clearer.

 

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The defensive end does a good job containing, but the blocks are pretty good, especially Beck's and Burt's. Here's a better view:

 

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The backside defensive end (red circle) is the read. If he crashed down the line, Heard would pull the ball and run it himself. He stayed put, so Heard handed off. (To be honest, I'm not sure there was a read, but it's not really important.)

 

To my knowledge Texas has run very little Outside Zone Read this season, so it's cool to see it again.

 

That's Chris Warren with the carry, by the way.

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OK, it's happened enough times now that I can confidently say Texas' DBs are having trouble handling switch releases. It's an important thing to watch going forward. 

 

SpryCleverIndianrockpython.gif

 

I'm pretty sure this is Bonney's cover bust. It doesn't make sense for Hill to chase No. 1 underneath. 

 

On a side note, I don't know what Davante Davis is doing up there on the top. I've seen him do this a few times, including against TCU when Josh Doctson caught an easy pass down the sideline. He doesn't have safety help, but it's like he thinks if the quarterback doesn't look to his side he doesn't have to cover.

 

And a last thing. I saw some people complaining on Twitter about Texas "not covering the No. 3 receiver" in the second half. It started I think because the announcers stupidly highlighted a look like this and said Texas was playing 2-on-3. I hope this diagram convinces you that that wasn't true.

 

Well, I'm certainly not an expert but this diagram doesn't convince me that that wasn't true. It looks like 2 on 3 to me and it looks like if the inside receiver turns out instead of in it could have been a easy completion and a long gain. But, as I say, I am not an expert and probably don't know what I'm talking about. 

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Well, I'm certainly not an expert but this diagram doesn't convince me that that wasn't true. It looks like 2 on 3 to me and it looks like if the inside receiver turns out instead of in it could have been a easy completion and a long gain. But, as I say, I am not an expert and probably don't know what I'm talking about. 

 

That would have been a better route combo for the coverage. Here's how I think it would have played out:

 

wIWL4nQ.png

 

That's just a guess, though, because I'm not even sure what the coverage was supposed to be.

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I had to make the lines thinner and oversimplify, but this is Bonney's sack on 3rd & 10. 

 

QuestionableAjarGoat.gif

 

So far Texas has switched to more zone coverage in the second half, including a couple of zone blitzes like this one. Bonney doesn't time this well — it's a coverage sack, really — but whatever works. 

So instead of finishing my paper, I decided to watch the Texas OU game to figure out what Texas would be running against team that are more pass happy than KSU.

 

Ryan and myself have been talking about Texas' new identity on defense ever since the OU game. The man-blitz scheme on defense. 

 

I mean I was reaffirmed in my first viewing that we run that blitz a lot and run man or a zone with a quick pattern read/match, but I also noticed a lot of stunting. Im going to chalk this up to Bedford trying to confuse and take advantage of the weak interior line of OU.

 

But then I saw this play again. Bedford has admitted to wanting to wanting to trick the other QB into not being able to read the coverage, but it seems something that goes less noticed is how he tricks the OL. A stunt is a very well known way of confusing OL, but holy hell does Texas use a lot of them (or at least on passing downs). 

 

But yeah. 3-4 to 3-3-5 okie look at base. And when we are playing run we have our ends playing 4i, nose at a 0tech and LBs at 6 techs. Generally. But it was hard to tell with the angles.

 

And I figured that OU is really going to be the identity of the defense for the rest of the year and it took me until the KSU game to be sure it was

 

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