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Found 39 results

  1. As Cowboys fans who are we rooting for today? Me personally I rather play the Giants than a red hot Arron Rodgers.
  2. Died today at the age of 84 from natural causes. Gifford is in the HOF.
  3. 1. Tampa Bay Buccaneers - Jameis Winston (QB - Florida State) Needs: QB, OL, DL, LB, WR 2. Tennessee Titans - Marcus Mariota (QB - Oregon) Needs: CB, LB, OL, DL, S, QB 3. Jacksonville Jaguars - Dante Fowler, Jr. (DE - Florida) Needs: OL, CB, RB, LB, S 4. Oakland Raiders - Amari Cooper (WR - Alabama) Needs: WR, CB, RB, OL, DL 5. Washington Redskins - Brandon Scherff (OT - Iowa) Needs: S, CB, OL, LB 6. New York Jets - Leonard Williams (DT - Southern Cal) Needs: QB, LB, OL, WR, RB 7. Chicago Bears - Kevin White (WR - West Virginia) Needs: LB, DL, OL, S, WR 8. Atlanta Falcons - Vic Beasley (LB - Clemson) Needs: LB, TE, OL, RB 9. New York Giants - Ereck Flowers (OT - Miami) Needs: S, LB, DL, OL, TE 10. St. Louis Rams - Todd Gurley (RB - Georgia) Needs: OL, WR, CB, S 11. Minnesota Vikings - Trae Waynes (CB - Michigan State) Needs: OL, LB, CB. DL 12. Cleveland Browns - Danny Shelton (DT - Washington) Needs: WR, QB, TE, LB, DL 13. New Orleans Saints - Andrus Peat (OT - Stanford) Needs: LB, OL, WR, TE, QB 14. Miami Dolphins - DeVante Parker (WR - Louisville) Needs: WR, OL, DL, CB, RB 15. San Francisco 49’ers - TRADED to SAN DIEGO 15. San Diego Chargers - Melvin Gordon (RB - Wisconsin) Needs: OL, LB, RB, DL, WR 16. Houston Texans - Kevin Johnson (CB - Wake Forest) Needs: WR, LB, CB, OL 17. San Diego Chargers - TRADED TO SAN FRANCISCO 17. San Francisco 49’ers - Arik Armstead (DL - Oregon) Needs: LB, CB, DL, OL, WR 18. Kansas City Chiefs - Marcus Peters (CB - Washington) Needs: OL, DL, WR, CB, LB 19. Cleveland Browns - Cameron Erving (C - Florida State) Needs: WR, QB, TE, LB, DL 20. Philadelphia Eagles - Nelson Agholor (WR - Southern Cal) Needs: CB, S, OL, WR, LB 21. Cincinnati Bengals - Cedric Ogbuehi (OT - Texas A&M) Needs: DL, WR, OL, LB, TE 22. Pittsburgh Steelers - Bud Dupree (DE - Kentucky) Needs: CB, S, LB, TE, OL 23. Detroit Lions - TRADED TO DENVER Denver Broncos - Shane Ray (DE - Missouri) Needs: OL, TE, DL, LB, QB 24. Arizona Cardinals - DJ Humphries (OT - Florida) Needs: LB, DL, RB, CB 25. Carolina Panthers - Shaq Thompson (LB - Washington) Needs: OL, WR, CB, RB, DL 26. Baltimore Ravens - Breshad Perriman (WR - Central Florida) Needs: WR, CB, LB, RB, S 27. Dallas Cowboys - Byron Jones (CB - Connecticut) Needs: CB, RB, DL, OL, LB 28. Denver Broncos - TRADED TO DETROIT Detroit Lions - Laken Tomlinson (OG - Duke) Needs: DL, CB, OL, RB, WR 29. Indianapolis Colts - Philip Dorsett (WR - Miami) Needs: S, OL, RB, LB, CB 30. Green Bay Packers - Damarious Randall (S - Arizona State) Needs: LB, CB, TE, DL, OL 31. New Orleans Saints - Stephone Anthony (LB - Clemson) Needs: LB, OL, WR, TE, QB 32. New England Patriots - Malcom Brown (DT - Texas) Needs: OL, WR, DL, CB
  4. submitted Today, 10:03 AM in Texas Longhorns Football By Mike Roach The Texas football program reached a new low when no Longhorn player was selected during the 2014 NFL Draft. Looking to get back on the board in 2015, UT hosted it’s annual pro timing day event on Tuesday. Pro days have become a big event within the evolution of the draft, and represent the last milestone on the calendar for prospective athletes to make their mark before the NFL draft. Pro days can be a make or break event when it comes to draft position, and most of the Longhorns made Tuesday’s event work in their favor. The Headliners Malcom Brown – Defensive Tackle Texas fans knew Brown was destined to be selected high after he rampaged through an All-American level junior year at Texas. Brown participated in the NFL scouting combine in February where he helped himself, and he understandably chose to stand on his testing results from that event. However, Brown participated in positional drills on Tuesday, being put to work by coaches from various teams. The Detroit Lions are said to be high on Brown following the departure Ndamukong Suh and Nick Fairley, but there are questions whether Brown will still be available when the Lions pick in the first round (23). Measurables: 6’2, 319 pounds 5.05 40-yard dash 26 repetitions on bench press (225 lbs) 29.5” vertical jump 7.84 3 cone drill 4.59 20-yard shuttle What scouts are saying: Scouts noted improvement from his sophomore to junior year. His strengths are considered to be quickness, athleticism, strength, hands, and instincts. As for weaknesses, scouts complain that he is not always physical at the point of attack and only has average power in his lower body – as a result he struggles against double teams. Scouts would like to see Brown improve his pass rush technique. Bottom Line: Penetrating big man who took a huge step forward as an NFL prospect in 2014. Brown has hand quickness and uses hands like an NFL starter. His instincts and feel off the snap help him to get into the backfield quickly. Some personnel men believe Brown can play multiple spots along the line in a 4-3 or 3-4 defense, which could put him in play for a high number of teams – NFL.com Stock: High to mid 1st Round Pick Jordan Hicks – Outside Linebacker Hicks came to Texas a highly touted prospect that struggled to reach his potential as he fought through injuries and trouble off the field. Hicks flourished under the new coaching staff, having a strong senior season and performing well at the NFL Scouting Combine. Like Brow, Hicks chose to stand on his testing numbers from that event. The Texas ‘backer performed well in drills on Tuesday, showing off his athleticism and versatility. Measurables: 6’1, 236 pounds 4.68 40-yard dash 20 repetitions on bench press (225 lbs) 38’ vertical jump (combine best) 6.78 3 cone drill (combine best) 4.15 20-yard shuttle What scouts are saying: Great looking frame with the right size and speed. Smart and passionate player who works hard in the weight room and on the field. The Texas staff reported to scouts that he has tremendous football character and understands how to prepare. He is a good tackler who doesn’t miss often, and can play outside of the box. Field discipline improved under Charlie Strong. Scouts point out that while he puts a lot of work into preparation, they question his field instincts and ability to freelance outside of a system. His play recognition is slower than you would like and they question his strength at the point of attack along with his injury history. "He'll probably be a coach after he's done with football. He loves it that much. His problem is that it's hard to project the player fitting into his traits because he struggles to make plays outside of the scheme." -- AFC area scout "Hicks needed the discipline that Charlie Strong brought with him. I saw enough improvement this year to give him a much higher grade than I had on him back in September." -- NFC East scout Stock: Late 3rd-6th round pick Quandre Diggs – Defensive Back Diggs was a big presence in his four years at Texas, even if that presence was packed into a small package. A four-year starter for the Longhorns who competed at the scouting combine, Diggs also chose to stand on his testing numbers. Diggs is thought of as a nickel back at the professional level that can cover in the slot and be used on special teams. Measurables: 5’9, 196 pounds 4.56 40-yard dash 17 repetitions on bench press (225 lbs) 35.5” vertical jump 7.22 3 cone drill 4.15 20-yard shuttle What Scouts are saying: Intelligent player who possesses plus instincts. Attacks the pass and is fearless in coverage. Good fluidity and a willing tackler. Strong player who rarely leaves the field and has versatility to play inside or outside. His weaknesses include body size and a lack of top end speed. He struggles in short area quickness and to shed blocks at the point of attack. “He's got draftable qualities and he showed great improvement this year. I'm just not sure what to do with him because he's too small to play outside, and teams in our division are good at slot corners. He's short and slow and that makes him matchup-deficient." -- NFC South area scout Diggs has started 80 percent of his games during his four years at Texas. He's battle-tested against some of the most explosive wide receivers in the country and has developed into a mentally tough player. Diggs will have to be a slot cornerback and will need to keep his weight down in order to match up with the speed he will see from the slot. Diggs is a Day 3 (Rounds 4-7) draft candidate who can help himself by running well in pre-draft drills. –NFL.com Stock: Late Round pick Malcolm Brown – Running Back Brown came to Texas as a superstar runner, and was projected to make an impact the moment he reached campus. Plagued by injuries early in his career, then by a struggling offensive system later in his tenure, Brown never reached the heights that were projected for him. Brown was a four year contributor who played hard and was has a spotless reputation off the field. He competed at the combine but chose to run again on Tuesday, turning in good results. Measurables: 5’11, 224 pounds 4.62 40-yard dash (combine) 4.44 40-yard dash (pro day) 19 repetitions on bench press (225 lbs) 34.5” vertical jump 6.86 3 cone drill (combine best) 4.15 20-yard shuttle What Scouts are saying: Strong finisher who delivers contact, can break arm tackles and falls forward at the end of runs. Plus blocker and capable pass receiver. No hesitation as a runner with a strong work ethic and high character. Weaknesses include a lack of top end speed and a resulting lack of explosive plays. He lacks creativity in the open field and rounds off cuts. Scouts doubt his ability to run outside and think he will make his living as an inside power back. "I was really down on Brown because so much was expected of him when he came to Texas. The more I'm around him and the more I watch him on tape, the more I think that he can be a quality backup in the NFL who can step in and do a serviceable job if called on to start." -- AFC South scout Stock: Rising as a 4th-6th round pick Potential to play professionally John Harris – Wide Receiver Harris enjoyed a breakout senior season after being a non-factor for the majority of his career. Undoubtedly the best playmaker on the field for an anemic Longhorn offense this season, Harris saw his draft stock go up as a result. Harris did not receive an invitation to the combine and will have to deal with criticisms of being a one year wonder. Harris performed well at Tuesday’s Pro day, with a very strong workout that included a 4.50 40 yard dash. With his 6’3” frame, Harris tested well enough and has the production to sneak into the back end of the draft. Stock: Rising – 6th-7th round pick Jaxon Shipley – Wide Receiver Shipley was expected to be everything his brother was in Austin, and though he struggled through injuries, the four-year starter played his heart out for the Longhorns. Shipley ran well at Pro Day, turning in a reported 4.45 40 yard dash, but only had nine repetitions on the bench press. As expected he performed well in passing drills and could possibly get selected in a late round if scouts see something they really like. Stock: Slightly rising – Late round pick or UDFA Cedric Reed – Defensive End A torn meniscus came at the worst time for Reed, who passed on a chance at the NFL to return to Texas for his senior season. While he was a force at times for the Longhorn defense, a senior year hampered by injuries is costing him in terms of draft buzz and interest from teams. Reed’s injury prevented him from running in the combine or at pro day but he did post 22 reps on the bench press. At this point Reed is being underrated in scouts’ eyes, but other than game tape, Reed is viewed as an unknown. Stock: Falling – Late round pick or UDFA Nate Boyer – Deep Snapper The former Green Beret has a chance to make it into camp as a long snapper and special teams coverage player if he can find the right situation. Boyer interviews incredibly well, but that won’t be enough to earn him more than a camp invitation. Geoff Swaim – Tight End The physical blocker turned in a better than expected 40 time (4.62) and tested well in most of the athletic events. His pro day was good enough to make an NFL camp for a shot to hang on. More than any other player, Swaim used Pro Day to his advantage – simply put, Swaim made it difficult for teams not to notice him. Mykkelle Thompson – Defensive back The inconsistent defender turned in stellar testing results, as expected, and could get an invite with the chance to hang on as a special teams player. Like Swaim, Thompson used Tuesday’s platform to his advantage. Steve Edmond – Middle Linebacker Edmond had a productive senior season, but turned in a 40 time of 4.94 at Pro Day, and struggled with flexibility in positional drills. His playing style is quickly being phased out in a passing league. Edmond will likely receive a camp invitation, but is going to have to prove his worth as a special teams player before having an opportunity at linebacker.
  5. [View the story "Louisville's Charles Gaines talks Charlie Strong" on Storify]
  6. By Corey Elliot, HornSports Correspondent INDIANAPOLIS – While most Texas Longhorn fans think it's deserved, in many ways, Jordan Hicks’ participation at the NFL Combine was not supposed to happen. Then again, a lot of what Hicks’ has endured was not supposed to happen. Not once, but twice, the Hicks was sidelined with season-ending injuries. Add that to the tumultuous times of the Texas football program since his arrival on the forty acres, and everyone would have nodded in understanding had Hicks thrown in the towel. Everyone except for Jordan Hicks, that is.. While everyone was writing him off, Hicks was busy crafting a new ending to his football story. Against steep odds, that story hasn’t ended yet. In five seasons at Texas, Hicks missed a combined 19 games due to a hip injury, and an Achilles injury. Beyond what's involved in healing physically, the mental struggle of recovering from injuries is often harder than the rehab. It takes effort to remain optimistic, especially to do so when facing a season-ending injury. “There was a difficult time after the first injury, I thought ‘I’m going to come back and ball out my next year’, I had a great mentality. Then I come back and have two (injuries) in a row,” Hicks said. “If I stayed healthy I could prove my ability, but going through that you start to question ‘what am I doing wrong?’ You just realize a lot of things are out of your control.” But in 2014, Hicks led the Longhorns with 138 tackles and received invitations to the Senior Bowl and the NFL Combine. This week, at the NFL Combine, Hicks has already met with a few organizations, though he declined to name specific teams. He is currently projected as best suited for a 4-3 defense by scouts and draft analysts, but the turnover on the Texas coaching staff may actually be a benefit. Regarding those conversations with teams and scouts, Hicks said, “We’re on the same page with what I can get better at – using my hands, playing off of contact – but I think they also believe I have good instincts.” He continued, “I’ve had four D coordinators and four linebacker coaches in five years. Yeah, you can say ‘geez’ but it’s made me versatile. I’ve seen a lot, been taught a lot of different techniques and styles.” Coming out of high school in Ohio, Hicks was a Parade All-American in 2009 and the Butkus Award winner, given to the best linebacker in high school football. That year, Texas won the Big 12 and lost to Alabama in the BCS National Championship. However, 2010 was not what Hicks and the Longhorns football program envisioned. But it wasn’t just injuries and the program's mediocrity that plagued Hicks’ time at Texas. At the 2012 Alamo Bowl, while sidelined with a hip injury, Hicks was one of two players sent home for violating team rules. Then, in 2013, in the regular season finale at Baylor, the Longhorns were one half away from winning the Big 12 conference .It was the the first time Texas was in reach of measurable success during Hicks' career on the 40 Acres – but, Hicks watched from the sideline with yet another injury. “It sucks to get there and go 5-7 my freshman year and finish off my career 6-7. That is very frustrating because you don’t come to the University of Texas for that type of standard,” Hicks said. “I look back and I say, if I could have done this, if we could have done this a few plays there a few plays here it would have been a completely different season. (Almost winning the Big 12) changes your perspective. It’s not that I sit there and sulk in my decision to attend Texas, I would never change my decision. I love the University of Texas.” The NFL draft takes place on April 30 - May 2. Jordan Hicks will be waiting on a phone call. He has another chapter to write in his story.
  7. HornSports Correspondent Corey Elliot is live at the NFL Combine and will be providing updates on the Longhorns in attendance. We'll post most of the updates in this thread with some pieces being standalone articles. Malcom Brown
  8. INDIANAPOLIS – One year after the Longhorns failed to have a single player selected in the NFL draft, five Texas players will participate in the league's Combine starting on Friday. More than five Texas players have professional football aspirations but only Malcolm Brown, Malcom Brown, Quandre Diggs, Jordan Hicks, and Cedric Reed received invitations to compete in Indianapolis. On Thursday, HornSports correspondent Corey Elliot talked to ESPN draft analyst Todd McShay to get his opinion on where each of the Longhorns might be selected and what they bring to an NFL roster. RB Malcolm Brown McShay: He’s got some power and runs hard. Not exceptional skill set. I think he’s going to have to earn his spot on a roster and work hard on special teams. McShay’s Projection: Day 3/ Undrafted Defensive Tackle - Malcom Brown McShay: Malcom Brown, I really like. I actually think he could be the second best defensive tackle in this class behind Danny Shelton from Washington. He finally kind of started putting it together this year. I saw him line up 3-technique, 5-technique, nose tackle, all over the defensive line. His Oklahoma tape was really good, TCU was just OK, but as the season progressed, I watched four games and three of the four games he was all over the field making plays. McShay’s Projection: Potential late 1st round. Defensive Back - Quandre Diggs McShay: Good player, better ball skills this year, better instincts. Doesn’t have elite size, doesn’t have elite top end speed – Most of the Texas defenders this year had their best year in couple years – I thought he performed well at the senior bowl. I think he has a chance to make it as a number 3, or number 4 corner. Draft Projection: Day 3 draft pick Linebacker - Jordan Hicks McShay: The one positive is, when you get to the league you get more time, flexibility for nutrition and all those things. You hope that a guy like that is able to do some things to help prevent injury. I like Hicks. Every time I turn on the tape he’s making a play. He’s good in coverage, he’s got instincts. He doesn’t have exceptional measurables – he probably won’t wow anyone here – but he’s the type of guy that it won’t surprise me seven years from now contributing on special teams, a really good back up that comes in and plays in certain situations. I think he’s a good football player and I hope he stays healthy. McShay’s Projection: Round 4-5 Defensive End - Cedric Reed No comments made by McShay Draft Projection: Day 3 draft prospect VIDEO RECAP:
  9. submitted on Today, 12:49 PM in Texas Longhorns Football By Coleman Feeley After the hype of the National Championship and the Super Bowl fades, the attention of the sports world shifts to basketball and then baseball, leaving football players to lurk in the shadows until August. During this time, a football team must never lose focus on their goals for next season; and not unlike the athletes still on the team, the graduating seniors must also keep their sights set on goals they’ve established. However, unlike athletes still on the team, seniors who have committed to the next level must now train without their teammates’ support. They have to begin to shift their focus from position specific workouts, training room visits, and film sessions to combine results. The NFL Combine is an annual ‘invitation only’ event that serves as a showcase for the upcoming draft. The Combine spotlights each football player’s athleticism rather than his on-field ability. The reason being: NFL scouts can study film anytime they want to a see what kind of player someone is; but how do you tell if a lineman is actually fast or if he just kick-slides well? How do you tell if a running back is following play calls or instinct? How can you tell if a corner is strong enough to hold his own against the likes of Calvin Johnson or Dez Bryant? The answer, the Combine. This year Texas has five members of its 2014 roster (Malcolm Brown (RB), Cedric Reed, Jordan Hicks, Malcom Brown (DT), Quandre Diggs) attending next week’s NFL Combine. Regardless of their positions, college football’s finest gather each year in Indianapolis to test their athleticism with the 40 yard dash, vertical leap, broad jump, three cone drill, 20 yard shuttle, 60 yard shuttle, the bench press, and the Wonderlic. These eight events are designed to characterize crucial football skills through a measurable medium. 40-Yard Dash ‘The 40’ tests acceleration and top-end speed. Athletes begin by taking their place at the starting line and entering their running stance (called a ‘start position’), generally as close to the line as possible to minimize the distance run, even if it is only by a few inches. It is legal for athletes to lean over the line only if their hand is placed behind the front edge of the starting line. A player must then hold their starting position and may begin whenever they are ready. An athlete may NOT ‘roll’ into his start; he must be motionless for a moment before beginning. While it is unrealistic for many football players to ever run forty yards in a straight line during a game, it is a great baseline for athleticism and speed. With current laser timing devices, the fastest forty clocked at the Combine was set in 2008, and belongs to Chris Johnson – East Carolina star and current running back for the NY Jets, who set a blazing 4.24 seconds. However, before the laser timing began, players were clocked with hand held stop watches and the fastest forty belongs to the great Bo Jackson with an astonishing 4.12! The Bench Press The bench press is obviously meant to test upper body strength and is weighed heavily for both offensive and defensive linemen. Athletes of any position perform as many repetitions as possible in one set with 225 pounds. Athletes must raise the bar to ‘full extension’ then lower the bar to their chest before raising the bar again. The record currently sits at 51 reps which was set by Justin Ernest in 1999. Unfortunately, Ernest did not play in the NFL and went undrafted adding to the argument that the Combine is not the best measurement of a football player. The All-American defensive tackle out of Oregon State, Stephen Paea, put up an impressive 49 reps in 2011 and was drafted 53rd overall by the Chicago Bears. The Vertical The vertical leap, of course, tests how high an athlete can jump, but it also tests lower body strength. Athletes stand with one arm extended as a device called a ‘Vertec’ is adjusted to the player’s height. Regardless of how heavy a player is, he must have an enormous amount of lower body strength and explosion to record a good vertical. This drill plays a crucial part in the judging of DBs and running backs. The current record of 45 inches was set in 2009 by cornerback Donald Washington out of Ohio State University (fig 1). 20 Yard Shuttle (Pro Agility) The 20 yard shuttle, also known as Pro Agility, is a great measure of an athlete’s quickness, ability to change direction quickly, as well as ability to move laterally. Speed, quickness, and acceleration are vitally important to the game of football, but more important is the ability to move quickly laterally. Linebackers, offensive linemen, running backs, and quarterbacks are all required to move laterally without losing speed on nearly every play. The 20 yard shuttle is a great indicator of this skill and often times weighed more heavily than the 40 yard dash. The record time for this event is shared by Jason Allen (CB) from Tennessee (‘06) and Brandin Cooks (WR) out of Oregon State (‘14). They both completed the drill in the blazing fast time of 3.81 seconds. (Mike Richardson from Notre Dame will assist in the demonstration.) The Broad Jump The broad jump in the NFL Combine is often overlooked by many fans, but it could possibly be one of the most important tests for defensive players and linemen. The broad jump tests lower body strength, and more importantly, it tests horizontal explosion, representative of the force a football player imposes on the ball carrier or defender he hits. This test is, by far, the most simple at the Combine. Athletes line up behind the front edge of the start line and then, without taking a step, leap out as far as possible. Athletes may not take any steps after landing and the measurement is taken from the foot farthest back. While a simple test, learning how to correctly ‘stick the landing’ is crucial. Many great broad jumps are rendered non-measurable due to an extra step taken upon landing. Or, more often, one foot lands further back and causes the loss of a good 6-8 inches. The record broad jump at the NFL combine was set in 2013 by Southern Miss inside linebacker Jamie Collins, currently with the New England Patriots, at 11 feet 7 inches! (Apologies for quality.) The 3 Cone Drill Often called the ‘L drill’, the 3 Cone Drill is sometimes confused with the 20 yard shuttle despite being a much more complicated event. This drill tests not only acceleration and quickness, it helps to evaluate an athlete’s ability to move in tight spaces. The Athlete starts much like he would for a 40 yard dash, behind the front edge of the line in a ‘start position’. He then runs to a line 5 yards away before turning and running back to the start. After the initial ‘down and back’ (10yds total) the athlete runs the 5 yards again, turns and runs a 90 degree angle and circles a cone an additional 5 yards away. After the athlete has completed the 180 degree turn at the third cone he will run around the second cone and return to the start. The record time for this event was clocked at 6.42 seconds by Jeffrey Maehl. The wide receiver out of Oregon recorded this time at the 2011 Combine. (Although this is not Jeffrey Maehl, or the record time,Mike Richardson from Notre Dame shows a great start and completion of the 3 Cone Drill) 60-Yard Shuttle This event is often forgotten when discussing the Combine due to its similarity to the 20-yard shuttle. The 60-yard shuttle is, however, not a lateral event. Results reflect not only the top end speed of an athlete but his ability to change directions in regards to vertical movement on the field. An important event for DBs and receivers, the 60 yard shuttle closely resembles routes run by receivers and tests an athlete’s ability to maintain top end speed for a longer period of time. The top performer in Combine history for this event was Brandin Cooks from Oregon State with a time of 10.72 seconds. Cooks had an amazing trip to the Combine last year (‘14) standing out as the top performer in the 40-yard dash, the 20-yard shuttle, and the 60-yard shuttle. He also set or tied the record in two events. (Here we see Mark Restelli complete his 60 yard shuttle in 11.01 seconds.) The Wonderlic Officially known as the ‘Wonderlic Cognitive Ability Test’, the Wonderlic tests an individual’s ability to learn and solve problems. The Wonderlic consists of 50 questions to be answered in 12 minutes. Unanswered questions are counted as wrong and the scores (out of 50) often directly correlate to IQ. The Wonderlic score that equates to average intelligence is around 20. In 1975 Pat McInally, a receiver/punter from Harvard, recorded the only known perfect score from an NFL player. Other notable high scores include those of Mike Mamula (DLine) with a 49, Ryan Fitzpatrick (QB) with a 48, Calvin Johnson (WR) with a 41, and Colin Kaepernick (QB) with a 38. As mentioned earlier, these events only show correlations between athletic ability and football ability. The Combine should never serve as a measuring stick for a player’s on-field ability; however, a good ‘forty’ time can always change minds. The 2015 Combine begins Tuesday, February 17.
  10. submitted on Today, 12:44 PM in Texas Longhorns Football By Coleman Feeley For many football fans, the Super Bowl is the most celebrated football game of the year. For this reporter, however, it’s much like Mardi Gras before Lent; one last blowout before the cold and morose time of the year devoid of football. In the months leading up to August, fans will find all the answers: “The Patriots could have done this†& “the Seahawks should have done thatâ€. These kinds of comments always bring me back to one of my favorite coaching colloquialisms: “The dumbest smart kid I knowâ€. Football is like a chess match where you must consider and weigh your options before making a move. In the final minute of Super Bowl XLIX, Pete Carroll and the Seahawks came face-to-face with a crucial visit to the red zone and a ‘checkmate’ moment. On the one yard line, Seattle lined up in the Gun with three wide receivers, a tight end, and their All-Pro running back, Marshawn Lynch (fig 1). The obvious call in this situation is to run the ball; however, the Seahawks squandered their opportunity and chose to attack the Patriots through the air. This is an easy call to dispute after the game, but in reality, it’s a much more difficult call to make on the sideline. New England lined up with essentially seven men on the line of scrimmage, three defensive backs, and the middle linebacker deep in the end zone to cover the middle – exactly what the Seahawks wanted to see from the Patriots. With the ball on the left hash, the formation that the Seahawks presented provided extra space for Jermaine Kearse (#15) and Ricardo Lockette (#83) to find space in the end zone. By running three routes to the left side of the formation, Seattle forced the Patriots to shift most of their coverage to the left, creating a ‘two-on-two’ situation on the offense’s right side. This was the match-up the Seahawks were trying to gain (fig 2). As Jermaine Kearse ran a pick route, Lockette ran a quick slant and produced a solid opportunity to score (fig 3). By running the ‘rub’ route, Kearse was able to shift the two-on-two coverage to a one-on-one situation. He also created a one-on-one situation that considerably favored the offense due to the positioning of strong safety, Malcolm Butler (fig 4). This match up reminds me of another coaching mantra I love: “Sometimes it’s the Xs and Os, and sometimes it’s the Jimmy’s and Joe’s.†Belichick’s pre-game comments that the game would come down to the players was right on the money. Rookie Malcolm Butler’s film preparation was clearly evident on this play as he closed the gap with considerable speed to intercept Russell Wilson and clinch the game with only twenty seconds left. Sometimes coaches get in their own way. As you can see, on paper, the play call from the Seahawks wasn’t truly as bad as it seemed. However, sometimes coaches need to put the game in players’ hands instead of the playbook. Regardless of the outcome or how “this one play decided the gameâ€, Super Bowl XLIX was one of the best contests of the season. It’s just too bad that “the dumbest smart kid I know†had to show up to the party.
  11. I'll go first... Seattle wins today, but it won't be a blowout like last year. I expect New England to be conservative on offense and stick with a steady dose of their running game to try to keep pressure off Tom Brady. In the 2nd half the Seahawks' advantage at the LOS will win out.
  12. One of my favorite all time Longhorns. Good article... http://www.si.com/nfl/2015/01/15/nfl-playoffs-earl-thomas-seattle-seahawks
  13. Truly one of my favorite all-time Longhorns! Doing us proud! "It's not about me being the best safety," Thomas said. "It's about me being the best defensive back ever. That's what I'm after. That's how you leave a mark on this game. When I think about the Hall of Fame and things like that, that's why I grind so hard. I know I have a chance to redefine this position." Full Article
  14. In week 2 of the 2014 NFL season, Texas was represented with 34 Longhorns on NFL rosters, 23 of which played, along with 2 coaches. Highlighting the week, Justin Tucker again impressed by kicking 4 field goals and two extra points. Other impressive performances by Longhorns include Sam Acho, who recorded an interception, and DBs Kenny Vaccaro, Earl Thomas, and Michael Griffin, who each recorded 7 tackles in their games. http://texassports.com/news/2014/9/16/FB_0916143635.aspx
  15. In week one of the NFL, Texas was well represented with 34 Longhorns on opening day rosters. Several of the players highlighted the weekend, including S Michael Griffin recording an interception for the Tennessee Titans and S Earl Thomas posting five tackles and a pass deflection for Seattle. On an unfortunate note, Pro Bowl LB Derrick Johnson ruptured his Achilles' tendon in Kansas City's game this weekend, ending his season. http://www.texassports.com/news/2014/9/9/FB_0909145102.aspx?path=football
  16. Browns WR Josh Gordon gets suspended for one year and possibly banned for life from the NFL for failing a drug test while Ray Ray beats his wife to a a pulp and gets a 2 game suspension?
  17. Hawkins was among a number of players cut by Philadelphia today. Still has a chance to be picked up by another team.
  18. This is a nice synopsis on all the Horns in the league.
  19. All Longhorns are still available here on day three for rounds 4-7. This is the place to give your predictions where the Longhorns will go. I'll start: Jeffcoat: 4th - Dallas Davis: 6th - Detroit Whaley: 7th - Indianapolis Fera: 7th - Houston The rest go UFA.
  20. Another chance for Vince Young? I'd love to see this guy get it together and have another run. He had far too much potential to just dwindle from the NFL's memory like he has.
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