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Showing content with the highest reputation on 09/16/2019 in all areas

  1. 4 points
    UTfish

    Prayers up for Shotime's Dad

    So sorry to hear that one of our own was struggling while we were enjoying the game. Will pray for strength for you and your Dad, Sho.
  2. 2 points
    PTA

    2020 Recruiting Board/Thread

    I actually was able to read the Hornsports write up on the web before it hit this board. weird!
  3. 1 point
    killerjoe

    Prayers up for Shotime's Dad

    Prayers up, Sho.
  4. 1 point
    TB14

    *****TEXAS vs. RICE GAME THREAD*****

    No Jones returns when they expect a possible fake or know it’ll be a fair catch. So all punts from around midfield or 4th and short. He can better break up a possible fake. Jake Smith is returning when they think they will have a return.
  5. 1 point
    primal defense

    2020 Recruiting Board/Thread

    Commitment 101: Three-star running back Ty Jordan is a versatile weapon Posted September 15th, 2019 Mike Craven Hookem.com staff mcraven@hookem.com Advertisement The Longhorns added an all-purpose back to the 2020 recruiting class on Sunday night when three-star West Mesquite product Ty Jordan became Texas’ 19th commitment of the cycle. Tom Herman’s program is inching towards another top-10 class after a slow start. The Longhorns currently hold the Big 12’s top recruiting class. Jordan held 25 offers and picked Texas over strong pitches from USC and Tennessee. 427 people are talking about this Texas plans to couple Jordan with five-star running back commit Bijan Robinson. While Robinson is a three-down option with the size to carry a heavy workload, Jordan is a scat-back with the potential to play running back, slot receiver, and in the return game. Jordan is a two-time all-district selection. Jordan rushed for 1,236 yards and 16 touchdowns last season, adding 169 yards and two touchdowns on 14 receptions. He’s the No. 11-ranked all-purpose back in the nation and a top-60 prospect in Texas, per 247Sports composite rankings. Skill set: Jordan is a modern offensive weapon not defined by position. He’ll play all over the field for Texas. Jordan is a potential third-down specialist at running back with the ability to play slot receiver, threaten defenses on jet-sweeps, and contribute in the return game on special teams. The three-star considers his versatility the strength of his game. “The one-dimensional back that just runs isn’t valued anymore,” said Jordan at the Under Armour camp in Dallas during the spring. “Coaches want backs who are dynamic and are three-dimensional with running, blocking and receiving. It’s a mismatch for a defense. I can go out in the slot and we don’t need to change personnel and that’s an advantage against defenses.” He’s not big enough to handle every-down running back duties at 5-9, 181 pounds, but he doesn’t need to be in order to fulfill his future role in Austin. Jordan is the type of playmaker Texas missed out on in Mookie Cooper and Ronald Moore. The Longhorns hope he can bring that type of excitement to the offense. He’s the type of player who can create big plays for an offense that lacked those in 2018. Immediate impact: Jordan should provide Texas an immediate option on special teams and are certain offensive packages. Don’t expect him to enroll on campus and compete for a spot in the two-deep with the likes of Keaontay Ingram, Jordan Whittington, and potentially Derrian Brown. That’s not mentioning Robinson arriving in the same class. That doesn’t mean he can’t carve out a role with a limited number of plays, especially with the new rule allowing participation in four games without losing eligibility. Fitting into the program: The next step for Texas’ offense is the big play. The Longhorns hope to address that issue on the recruiting trail and Jordan is another swiss-army knife type weapon for Herman and offensive coordinator Tim Beck to slowly work into Texas’ offense. Jordan’s work ethic and a love for the game should translate well into Herman’s blue-collar program. Recruiting at the position: Texas’ coaching staff, specifically running back coach Stan Drayton, needed a big year recruiting the position in the 2020 cycle. Drayton overachieved by landing Robinson and Jordan, a duo built for Texas’ future offensive plans. The Longhorns couldn’t have done better considering in-state five-stars Jase McClellan and Zachary Evans didn’t join the class. Instead of fans talking about the in-state misses, the duo of Robinson and Jordan give Texas building blocks for the future. Texas' 2020 recruiting class A list of Texas commitments in the 2020 recruiting class. PLAYER POS. SCHOOL STARS COMMITMENT DATE Hudson Card QB Lake Travis 4 May 25 (2018) Logan Parr OG San Antonio O'Connor 4 Oct. 28 (2018) Jake Majors OG Prosper 4 Jan. 24 Jaylen Garth OT Port Neches-Groves 4 Feb. 17 Jaden Hullaby ATH Bishop Dunne 3 March 30 Ja'Quinden Jackson QB/ATH Duncanville 4 June 3 Kitan Crawford CB John Tyler 4 June 21 Prince Dorbah OLB Highland Park 4 July 9 Vernon Broughton DT Cy Ridge 4 July 17 Van Fillinger DE Canyon Court (Utah) 3 July 18 Andrej Karic OT Southlake Carroll 3 July 24 Bijan Robinson RB Salpointe Catholic (Ariz.) 5 Aug. 2 Ethan Pouncey CB Winter Park (Fla.) 4 Aug. 6 Jerrin Thompson S Lufkin 4 Aug. 11 Princely Umanmielen DE Manor 4 Aug. 12 Xavion Alford S Alvin Shadow Creek 4 Aug. 16 Quentin Johnston WR Temple 4 Aug. 17 Joshua Eaton CB Aldine Macarthur 4 Aug. 23 Ty Jordan RB West Mesquite 3 Sept. 15 https://www.hookem.com/story/commitment-101-three-star-running-back-ty-jordan-versatile-weapon/
  6. 1 point
    Sirhornsalot

    2020 Recruiting Board/Thread

    Ty already got his Kate appearance.
  7. 1 point
    Yea, surly he knew that. But I got a chuckle from it. Thanks @UTfish
  8. 1 point
    PTA

    Longhorn News/Discussion (Non-recruiting)

    No...you hope the MRI comes back negative.
  9. 1 point
    MikeV73

    Prayers up for Shotime's Dad

    Thinking of you and your dad sho. If he is anything like you we all know he is a great guy! Positive thoughts to him.
  10. 1 point
    Aaron Carrara

    Issues with Content

    Bogey - got your DM too.
  11. 1 point
    Aaron Carrara

    Issues with Content

    Working on it guys! Thanks for letting us know.
  12. 1 point
    Johnstark23

    Potential fix for faking injuries

    And usually especially with a QB in that situation (something minor that doesn’t necessitate a prolonged stoppage in play to get them off the field) a coach is going to burn the timeout anyway so that the backup can get a few snaps warm up the arm and take a deep breath.
  13. 1 point
    Captain Hookem

    Potential fix for faking injuries

    If a player goes down for an injury that causes a delay, they should sit the rest of that series. The tanking on Saturday was ridiculous. And even if most of those were legit, rotating back in players who just went out led to more delays because they weren't ready to play yet. Having to sit for one play does nothing to solve this problem. Sitting for the series is a good balance between actual player health and the need to keep the game moving. Maybe a coach can use a timeout if he wants to avoid the Series Sit rule. However at the moment there is no real penalty for delaying a game like this, and there should be. Thoughts?
  14. 1 point
    Johnstark23

    Future of College Football Power

    Thanks Mark how could I leave that off F aggy rat bastards
  15. 1 point
    Johnstark23

    Future of College Football Power

    To quote the always quotable @Bear19 F aggy
  16. 1 point
    Switch To Morning Starts on the Sprinkler Settings Now! Fungus prevention is critical as we move into fall Labor Day is the day when we switch our watering start times from evenings to mornings. It seems like such a simple thing and simple things can often be discarded without consequence. But this is not one of them. It is vitally important that we make the switch to morning waterings. This will help prevent the conditional setup for lawn fungus as well as other fungus in the landscape. Those with St Augustine turf are particularly vulnerable during the fall. Fall is made for fungus. The conditions become right and allow it to flourish. A homeowner with a sprayer and some fungicide can remedy it, but unless you change the conditions, it will likely return within a week or two. Why is preventing fungus damage so important? It’s important because it happens during a time of year when grow-back or recovery is highly unlikely. As temperatures cool, grass growth slows down. When temperatures are in the 50s at night, there will literally be no growth. We’re not far away from that time. So whatever damage the lawn suffers, it may be late next spring before you see the area fill in unless you re-sod it. Here is a list of some things you can do to reduce the chances of fungus forming in your lawn and landscape: 1. Change your watering start time to early mornings at Labor Day. 2. Reduce the amount of water you’re putting onto the lawn. If you’ve been watering three times a week at 15 minutes per zone. Reduce to 10 minutes per zone. 3. If you haven’t already put your fall fertilizer down, do so as soon as possible. And when you do, reduce your spreader setting/ratio. For example, if you normally have a spreader setting of 9 for this application, change to 8 instead. Less nitrogen will help reduce fungus chances as fungus will feed on the nitrogen. 4. Lower the blade on your lawn mower by one notch to allow more sunlight to reach the soil surface. 5. Fall tree trimming will allow more sunlight onto the turf, which reduces fungus risk. How will I know that my lawn has a fungus? What is probably the most common lawn fungus in most parts of Texas is Brown Patch. It is distinguishable by it’s round shape. It will start out small, then grow in all directions outward, creating a larger ring as it goes. Round spots that have dead or dying turf are to be taken seriously. Take-All Patch and Dollar Spot are other fungus we deal with, but much less often. What do I do if I discover that my lawn has Brown Patch? A liquid fungicide, sprayed over the affected area and also a 8-inch perimeter of that area in the green grass, is the answer. You will likely want to spray again a week or so later just to be sure its gone. You should also stop and examine what it is that is causing the fungus in the first place. Once you’ve figured that out, respond accordingly. Sometimes, it’s just low places in the landscape which have no drainage. Not All Projects Are The Same. Ask The Right Questions At Green Thumb, we build a lot of things with stone. We build flagstone patios, chopped stone borders, outdoor kitchens and fireplaces, etc. And when we do, we employ steel rebar to keep our creations solid and in one piece. Even doing this is not a guarantee that breakage won’t occur, but it goes a long way in keeping it together for much longer durations of time as opposed to not using rebar. In my opinion, this is a critical question to ask when you’re speaking with a landscape company proposing to create a border or patio for you. The reason is our black, gumbo clay which will contract, expand, erode, shift. If rebar isn’t in place, patios, borders will simply fall apart in short time. On television, you’ll see a commercial from one of the contractor advisor services which states that they’ll tell you what your job is supposed to cost by comparing other such projects in the area. What they can’t tell you is – are we talking about the same patio? So often, bids are undercut simply because the rebar is left out of the project. They save labor and material costs doing it, and pass along a lower cost to you. While you’re pretty happy for a few weeks after the project because of the savings, that can quickly come crashing down when a few weeks later, you see the first crack/shift in the stone. Some small cracking in the joints is to be expected over years, thats not what I’m referring to here. Winter Provides Reason for Tree Trimming I’ll repeat this again next month, but given the fact that we’ve missed out on winter for the past three years, you might anticipate that this year – we’ll get winter. That can mean ice and snow or sleet. When we do get snow and sleet, one of the things I worry most about are the trees. Especially the ones that have not been maintained very well. In those instances, the canopies will be heavy. Add ice and snow to that canopy and suddenly you have limbs breaking or worse. So it would be wise to take the opportunity now to address your trees and have them trimmed to reduce the weight they’ll have during the winter. Most don’t know this, but Pine Trees of all types will shed about a third of their pine needles during late summer and fall. This is done in anticipation of snow/ice accumulation during winter. Like we’re trying to do with trimming, it reduces the weight of its canopy naturally, making breakage during winter much less likely. (Mark’s column each month is sponsored by Stagecoach Trailers, Inc., of Naples, Texas. Find them at www.stagecoachtrailers.com)
  17. 0 points
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