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joeywa

Requested BBQ Smoking Thread****Part 4****

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Don't knock it, Jim.  You've had my BBQ before.  That smoked pie is off the charts! 

 

I look forward to trying it and yes you can fix a some great BBQ. Deb will vouch for that. My friends y'all have a great week

 

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Did my first ever brisket on Saturday for my wife's birthday. Interesting day to say the least. She sprung the news that she wanted a brisket on me about 6:00 Friday night and then invited a bunch of friends and family over for a day of drinking, playing games, goofing off and waiting to see what I was gonna screw up. Got the fire started later than I intended and had to cook it hotter than I wanted but I got it done. Did brisket, fresh corn on the cob and smoked some potatoes as well all on the pit. Thoughts?? Be nice, or not, I don't care. No one has reported being ill yet so there is that.

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Honest thoughts here UTK, on the pit, looks good.  Bark developing nicely. 

 

On the cutting board, the flat looks a bit dry and not much smoke ring.  I attribute this to you having to ramp up the heat to meet the wife's deadline, so in essence, you baked it rather than smoked it.  No biggie.  You were under time constraints, so it's completely acceptable.  For your first effort, you done good. 

 

Couple of thoughts for your next smoke:

 

If your wife tells you that there's going to be folks coming over for supper, and she wants it by 6, tell her it'll be ready when it's ready, and stock up on more beer for the guests.  They'll wait, I promise.  Never had anyone walk out and say "Screw this noise, I ain't waitin' for the brisket to be ready." 

 

Secondly, when you slice it, slice it across the grain, which is not necessarily from side to side, it's usually going to be at a slight angle.

 

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When you smoke it low and slow, you'll get a better smoke ring.  When you get up above 300 degrees, you lose quite a bit of the smoke process.

 

Overall, good job.  Keep at it.  You'll pick up little things, (that others won't necessarily notice, but you will,) that will make your briskets better almost every time you smoke one. 

 

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Austin BBQ-hating commies lose another round

 

http://www.statesman.com/news/news/local/austin-council-committee-to-consider-barbecue-smok/nnBzx/

 

 

"An Austin City Council member’s proposal to regulate smoke wafting from barbecue joints into residential areas has been chewed over by two committees, who have now both decided they don’t much like the taste of it....."

 

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On 12/3/2014 at 1:44 PM, streettopeschel said:

 

 

i've never heard of it either jim. i think joey's making sh*t up. and i'm guessin' the fire started because not all the bourbon was in the pie.

I was thinking the same thing. I grew up around a grill and smoker, but I have never heard of a BBQ'd or smoked pie. Joeywa, you need to challenge Bobby Flay to a pie grill-off. :P

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I've got some pics of it.  ui2ik71528b6402viewattth12c84a68c88.jpg

This next one was the first attempt  I learned that you need to leave it covered with foil while in the pit or else the crust starts to turn black-see the pie crust at ~5 o'clock 

40bef811.jpg

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BBQ is near and dear to my heart. I've read most of this thread and would like to give my thoughts and ideas about grilling or smoking. 

1. If you can, always choose wood. The flavor imparted to the meat is much better than charcoal. I myself prefer a mixture of oak and mesquite. Pecan is another good choice.

2. I have three pits. For Hambugers, sausage and steaks I use a Weber round grill. All of these are quick meats and are a hot, quick cook. This type of grill is perfect in my opinion.

3. For chicken I use a barrel smoker. I build the fire to the side opposite the flue. It doesn't cook as quick as a small grill but will impart a smokey flavor.

4. For brisket and ribs I use a smoker with a fire box. I was lucky enough to find a New Braunfels smoker before they went all electric. Start your fire an hour before you put your meat on so you can get the smoker up to heat and keep a fairly level temp. As the fire dies down you will have to add kindling and larger pieces to keep up the temp you want. Just know that kindling will spike the temp and chunks or large pieces will smother your fire. It has to be balanced. If you don't know a recipe for homemade rubs, I'd like to suggest the Fiesta brand. They make a good Rib and Brisket rub.

5. My next project is to build a stationary pit. 4' X 3', metal frame with tin sides. The grill about 3.5' to 4' above the ground. The fire is started outside of the pit in a burn pile and introduced via a side door after it has burned down to coals. This is Hill country BBQ at it's finest. It cooks Roast sized pieces of Mutton, beef or pork and whole chickens. A thin BBQ sauce is usually applied as the meat cooks.

 

 

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12 minutes ago, joeywa said:

I've got some pics of it.  ui2ik71528b6402viewattth12c84a68c88.jpg

This next one was the first attempt  I learned that you need to leave it covered with foil while in the pit or else the crust starts to turn black-see the pie crust at ~5 o'clock 

40bef811.jpg

It looks badass. Where can I get one. I understand how the smokey flavor combines with the pecans and corn syrup. I just can't wrap my head around a smokey pie crust.

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2 hours ago, Baron said:

It looks badass. Where can I get one. I understand how the smokey flavor combines with the pecans and corn syrup. I just can't wrap my head around a smokey pie crust.

The smoke doesn't so much permeate the crust of you wrap it in foil. You have to remember, you're dealing with a frozen pie crust, AKA Marie Callender's shells. It needs to cook, which it will under the foil. It also takes longer to cook than in an oven. Don't ask me why. But as long as you cover the pie, the crust doesn't take very much smoke at all. 

It's solid on the day you cook it, but once you refrigerate it and have it the next day, Holy Crap it's awesome. The smoke flavor settles into the pie filling as it's congealing in the fridge. It's like smokey bourbon pecan candy. 

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2 hours ago, Baron said:

BBQ is near and dear to my heart. I've read most of this thread and would like to give my thoughts and ideas about grilling or smoking. 

1. If you can, always choose wood. The flavor imparted to the meat is much better than charcoal. I myself prefer a mixture of oak and mesquite. Pecan is another good choice.

2. I have three pits. For Hambugers, sausage and steaks I use a Weber round grill. All of these are quick meats and are a hot, quick cook. This type of grill is perfect in my opinion.

3. For chicken I use a barrel smoker. I build the fire to the side opposite the flue. It doesn't cook as quick as a small grill but will impart a smokey flavor.

4. For brisket and ribs I use a smoker with a fire box. I was lucky enough to find a New Braunfels smoker before they went all electric. Start your fire an hour before you put your meat on so you can get the smoker up to heat and keep a fairly level temp. As the fire dies down you will have to add kindling and larger pieces to keep up the temp you want. Just know that kindling will spike the temp and chunks or large pieces will smother your fire. It has to be balanced. If you don't know a recipe for homemade rubs, I'd like to suggest the Fiesta brand. They make a good Rib and Brisket rub.

5. My next project is to build a stationary pit. 4' X 3', metal frame with tin sides. The grill about 3.5' to 4' above the ground. The fire is started outside of the pit in a burn pile and introduced via a side door after it has burned down to coals. This is Hill country BBQ at it's finest. It cooks Roast sized pieces of Mutton, beef or pork and whole chickens. A thin BBQ sauce is usually applied as the meat cooks.

 

 

Great post. I use a gas grill for sausage (like Eckrich) and sometimes chicken. I use my pit for almost everything else. I use Royal Oak lump to start all my fires. Then it's all about the wood.  

 

I also had a New Braunfels as my starter pit 16+ years ago. Back when they weren't owned and ruined by Char Broil. That thing was a machine. Love my Old Country that I have now. My buddy Chas Holmstrom was the owner of this company. He tragically passed away last month from a heart attack at 47 and left behind a wife and kids. Awful deal. It made my Old Country irreplaceable, at least to me. 

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52 minutes ago, Bear19 said:

Do any of you guys put any kind of sauce on your brisket about 30 minutes before taking it off the grill?. I've never done this but a friend of mine did and it was great.

Sauce on brisket?  Only if I've screwed something up. 

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@Bear19,

I tried something this weekend for the first time with brisket.  After the brisket was done and rested, I took it out of the wrap and cut off about an inch of the end of the point, and both sides from the point, same, about an inch or two thick slice.  I cubed these, put a dry rub on them that had more sugar content, then drizzled them with a small bit of Stubbs BBQ Sauce.  Tossed them in a pan really well so they were all coated with the rub and a light glaze of the sauce. 

Threw them back into the pit at 200 for about an hour or so.  Boom-burnt ends.  The glaze and sugar-based rub carmelized on the pieces nicely, and they were very tender.  It was a hit.

 

 

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27 minutes ago, joeywa said:

@Bear19,

I tried something this weekend for the first time with brisket.  After the brisket was done and rested, I took it out of the wrap and cut off about an inch of the end of the point, and both sides from the point, same, about an inch or two thick slice.  I cubed these, put a dry rub on them that had more sugar content, then drizzled them with a small bit of Stubbs BBQ Sauce.  Tossed them in a pan really well so they were all coated with the rub and a light glaze of the sauce. 

Threw them back into the pit at 200 for about an hour or so.  Boom-burnt ends.  The glaze and sugar-based rub carmelized on the pieces nicely, and they were very tender.  It was a hit.

 

 

That's awesome! I'm taking my 1st crack at burnt ends this weekend for the game & the Canelo fight!

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Hey Joey!  I do A LOT of smoking on my Weber Kettle. I love this thing. I'm saving for a reverse flow (probably a Lang) but until then, it's what I rock with.  With all that said, have you seen/heard of the Slow N Sear?  It's an accessory for kettle grill for direct/indirect set up.  I love it.  Here are a few pics. That's not my turkey. LOL! But that's my smocked mac & cheese :D

 

SNS_PLUS_1-500x333.jpg

turkey-3.jpg

Smoked_Mac.jpg

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I have not.  Tell me about it.  Looks like a way to isolate your smoking wood chunks and keep them above the hot coals, allowing them to smoke/smolder and not completely catch fire.  Is that about right?

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I'm in the market for a new grill/smoker. I have about a $500 budget and currently have a barrel smoker and a round Weber charcoal grill. I'm looking for something nice that will last. Heard great things about Traeger and Big Green Egg. 

 

What do y'all recommend I do?

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20 hours ago, joeywa said:

I have not.  Tell me about it.  Looks like a way to isolate your smoking wood chunks and keep them above the hot coals, allowing them to smoke/smolder and not completely catch fire.  Is that about right?

Yes, but that of course depends on air flow. I've had all vents open and it can get to 600 deg. rather quickly. But, yes, it sets up a direct/indirect cooking zone. You add water to the trough which further separates the zones, stabilizes the temps while also adding moisture to the chamber. You kinda set up a snake method with the coals. I generally just mix my wood in with the coal as opposed to just laying them on top. I've gotten 10+ hours or continuous cook time at 225-250 no problem.

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2 hours ago, TB14 said:

I'm in the market for a new grill/smoker. I have about a $500 budget and currently have a barrel smoker and a round Weber charcoal grill. I'm looking for something nice that will last. Heard great things about Traeger and Big Green Egg. 

 

What do y'all recommend I do?

I know you currently have a barrel smoker but personally with $500 I'd look into an Oklahoma Joe reverse flow offset stick burner.  They retail for about $500-$600. I know they're now owned by CharBroil and from my understanding the quality of them has diminished but I couldn't tell you that from personal experience.  The ones I've seen appear to be well built.  I'd look at the thickness of the materials and if you're comfortable with it then pull the trigger.  There are mods that can be done to them to "upgrade" your pit and that may be a good route.  I'm only telling you this because as badly as I want to keep saving for something like a Lang, I'm getting impatient and may do exactly this. LOL!  I'm not a fan of pellet smokers (nothing against them; just call me more traditional I guess) and from my understanding the BGE are awesome but take time to master.  When it comes down to it tho, learn your pit, be happy with it and you'll produce some great que!  Good luck!

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On 9/12/2017 at 5:18 PM, Dbut82 said:

Hey Joey!  I do A LOT of smoking on my Weber Kettle. I love this thing. I'm saving for a reverse flow (probably a Lang) but until then, it's what I rock with.  With all that said, have you seen/heard of the Slow N Sear?  It's an accessory for kettle grill for direct/indirect set up.  I love it.  Here are a few pics. That's not my turkey. LOL! But that's my smocked mac & cheese :D

 

SNS_PLUS_1-500x333.jpg

turkey-3.jpg

Smoked_Mac.jpg

I can't find a price for the lang's on their website. Do you know the price of their standard 36 inch grill?

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