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Daniel Seahorn

Are You #TeamBuechele Or #TeamEhlinger?

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This is from the Cheap Seats against Cal last season (September 19, 2016):

 

Where to begin? The points allowed could be a precursor for the conference season. I do think your prescription for defensive improvement is on point. The way to stop an effective air raid/Briles veer raid are twofold: First, your team has to be able to tackle in space. Second, you must pressure the quarterback ALL GAME LONG (and get some legal licks on him as well).

To be able to tackle in space you have to recruit players not simply who won the genetic lottery but instinctive, aggressive players who are tackling machines. The problem that arises seems to be that the defense has to pursue to such a degree that the depth required of quality tackling machines is part of the must have to effectively defend a team that is set on attacking the entire field. This is so much easier said than done. For whatever reason, BIG XII coaches are putting most of their eggs in the recruiting basket on the offensive side of the ball and ignoring, for the most part, the reality of the problem. They have entered the arms race but all they have achieved is mutually assured destruction. Until a team deploys a strategy that answers the true problem, look for this to continue. Until a team can convince defensive recruits that it is in their best interest not to want maximum playing time but to share snaps with other equally talented recruits, I fear consistency on defense is going to be a week to week thing. By platooning the defensive line and secondary (which are the two major functions in slowing down a passing attack) this can be achieved. 

 

Hitting the quarterback is a must in our conference. Look at what happened to Baylor last year. They were as offensively talented as anyone but once QB1 was knocked out they were a different team. If everyone cannot see that this strategy is already being deployed against the Longhorns then they are willfully blind. I think Beuchele throws a great deep ball. However, he does not have the body to withstand a season, not yet at least. It is apparent that once a defense commits to take the over the top ball away from Boo, all he can throw with any reliability is the hitch. He cannot yet read a defense at speed with any reliability. At that point, the risk of interception or stalled drive becomes much greater. This is not an attempt to kick him in the nuts. I am simply stating the obvious. If a defense has neutralized Boo then it begins to tighten on the running game. And I cannot help but think that opposing defensive coordinators best case scenario is to knock Shane out or render him ineffective to the point that we reach for Swoopes. Without the threat of the deep ball, Texas becomes one-dimensional.

 

I do believe the kids played hard and I appreciate that. Your point of Charlie coming in as the defensive guru is a troubling one because it makes one ask if he would relinquish control of naming the defensive coordinator to keep his job. I may be wrong but I do not think that Longhorn Nation has the patience to grant him another two years to fix the defense. In fact, I think the next 9 games will answer if Charlie is allowed to stay or if Texas opts to go in another direction. I think Charlie will retain his job if he wins 8 games minimum this season. Any less than that and it is a crap shoot at best. I think a collapse would certainly spell his exit from Austin.

 

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3 hours ago, Embrey said:

Over the middle was a crap shoot with him.

a crap shoot?...The OC did not call one single pass between the hash marks that I can recall. I dont think you can blame Shane for any inability to throw over the middle. Hell....maybe he cant make that throw, but how would anyone know?

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20 hours ago, doc longhorn said:

Ha, ha - seriously?  Who fed me my opinion?  That comment sounds like hurt feelings.

The opinion I expressed was I don't really give a damn what Herman ran in the past.  If he is any kind of coach at all, he will adapt his offense to the talent he has.  Now, that being said, I wouldn't be surprised if he let Beck have his head on what offense to run.  At least I hope that is the case.

And my feeling on "fit" is there are probably several high school QB's that would "fit" Herman's offense.  But they would be too young - just like Sam.  So it's academic

My whole point being if he wanted to "fit" a kid, how about fitting a kid to an offense suitable to his skills?  A kid with experience? A kid that has passing accuracy almost the same as Colt?

Just a friendly jab at the idea that everyone who doesn't agree with your opinion is parroting a "talking head."   We're having fun here, no? 

 

Coaches can say all they want that they conform to the talents of their players... and the good ones do to a point.  However, they want to run their scheme - and gravitate toward players who fit it.... it's what they know it's what they are comfortable running.  Barry Switzer helped Troy Aikman find a place to transfer. 

Shane is a better quarterback; Sam fits the system better; Coaches seem to prefer Sam; I would start Shane.....

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I am in the camp of whatever Hermann and his staff think can run the offense the best...my personal preference doesn't mean SQUAT...whoever the backup is has got to be prepared to step up and get the job done when called..

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Well, I will say this that I'm #TeamDontGetTheQBKilled because of the LT position.  I watched parts of the USC game again (because I have nothing better to do at 1am when I can't sleep) and I've never seen a guy (Tristan) miss on so many blocks. In addition, he is so slow coming out of his stance and for a guy as big as a tree, he gets manhandled at times by smaller guys.  I'm really concerned about the blindside for whichever QB is back there.  Hopefully it was playing out of position on the left side that confused the kid.  If so, here's hoping he never travels to England and has to drive.

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“When you can run the football, you can pretty much control the game and do what you want to do,” offensive coordinator Tim Beck said. “We were unable to do that (against USC). We were unable to run the football, which hindered us.”

Why is it that every team USC has played except us is able to run the football?

There is a huge difference in "can't" run it and "won't" run it. Beck wouldn't run it against USC. His quote is laughable.

Regardless of the QB Beck better start running the ball. I don't want some lame excuse about Conner Williams being hurt hindering us from running. If we resort to passing 50+ times a game Tristan Nickelson will get our QB carted off on a stretcher.

4 freaking carries for Warren!!! Beck is really pissing me off with his BS.

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26 minutes ago, RickyFlair said:

“When you can run the football, you can pretty much control the game and do what you want to do,” offensive coordinator Tim Beck said. “We were unable to do that (against USC). We were unable to run the football, which hindered us.”

Why is it that every team USC has played except us is able to run the football?

There is a huge difference in "can't" run it and "won't" run it. Beck wouldn't run it against USC. His quote is laughable.

Regardless of the QB Beck better start running the ball. I don't want some lame excuse about Conner Williams being hurt hindering us from running. If we resort to passing 50+ times a game Tristan Nickelson will get our QB carted off on a stretcher.

4 freaking carries for Warren!!! Beck is really pissing me off with his BS.

Are we in the same shape we've been in for several seasons? No OL again?  Seems groundhog day never ends.

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I'm still #TeamLonghorn, but I stand by my statement that I think Sam will hold up better with this line.  In addition, I think Sam would stretch the field better with his gunslinger type mentality  as well as probably has a better feel for rush and can take off.  He will make a mostake or two, but I think he will more than make up for them.

 Maybe it was his first game, but Shane seemed timid to trust his WRs to win their matchups.  I know ISU was dropping 8, but it seemed Shane was waiting for wide open receivers.  His best throw of the night was the TD to Carter where he led him to the spot.

I think the defense has earned the right to have the offense do something different to give them the support they deserve.  

I gotta say that I'm #TeamEhlinger at the moment to get #TeamLonghorn offense going.  The defense can hold Oklahoma to 20-30pts, but that means the offense must score more.

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12 hours ago, texbound said:

The defense can hold Oklahoma to 20-30pts, but that means the offense must score more.

I am betting Mayfield gets knocked out of the game in the first half.  OK its wishful thinking but OU wont score more than 21 points on Orlando and the boys. 

The problem is our offense cant score more than 20 points in regulation the last 2 games.  Hell even Northern Iowa scored more than 17 points on Iowa State.

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2 hours ago, DMAC said:

I am betting Mayfield gets knocked out of the game in the first half.  OK its wishful thinking but OU wont score more than 21 points on Orlando and the boys. 

The problem is our offense cant score more than 20 points in regulation the last 2 games.  Hell even Northern Iowa scored more than 17 points on Iowa State.

What makes people so certain there offense is any better than what USC was? They can run the ball and throw for yards. Same talk with USC. Have a good QB, USC has a top draft pick also... what I'm getting at is why would we be THAT much more scared of them then a past opponent? I don't see them putting up 30. And there secondary is terrible, our WR will tear them apart even with little time to throw. I firmly believe that. 

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37 minutes ago, okiehorn said:

What makes people so certain there offense is any better than what USC was? They can run the ball and throw for yards. Same talk with USC. Have a good QB, USC has a top draft pick also... what I'm getting at is why would we be THAT much more scared of them then a past opponent? I don't see them putting up 30. And there secondary is terrible, our WR will tear them apart even with little time to throw. I firmly believe that. 

If and when our WRs get open they still need a QB to deliver the ball.  I agree with an earlier post that I would like to see if they were actually getting open vs ISU or if our QB was gun shy delivering the ball.

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I have always been a fan of Shane since he set records as a true freshman QB but I am beginning to think something isn't clicking with Shane at QB.  Apparently according to a film review at TFB Shane never even looked at some open receivers.  I remember Herman earlier in the year critiquing Shane as not progressing through his reads so maybe this the problem.  Shane has a year under his belt so this shouldn't be a glaring issue with him.  Im sure his confidence in his OL is lacking and rightfully so.  TFB points out just a couple times but there were probably more.  SMH

 

Quote

 

This play ended up being a pick for Iowa state.  With a 4 man rush, two guys got through, and the spy in the middle of the field is coming hard at the Horn QB.  Buechele’s looking down the middle of the field, but he’s gotta see Kyle Porter out on the right side.  You’re taught never to throw it back over the middle of the field, and you have to know where your release valve is as a QB.  Porter’s probably in Minneapolis by now if Shane sees him.  He’s all alone outside the hash.

P10-2-1024x768.jpg

 

 

The safety is back there licking his chops as Shane let fly, and as I watched this I couldn’t help but think that while Buechele has to be better here, so does his O line.  With a 4 man pressure, he shouldn’t have to be under so much duress.

P11-2-1024x768.jpg

 

http://texas.thefootballbrainiacs.com/2017/10/trench-warfare-texas-vs-iowa-state/

 

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It became pretty clear to me about midway through the ISU game that Ehlinger is the correct choice at QB. He seems more able to escape pressure - which is a must given the porous offensive line. I was mildly surprised we didn't see him come in at any point in the game Thursday even given how ugly it was becoming on offense. I expect Buechele will have a short leash this week.

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25 minutes ago, dmanderson21 said:

It became pretty clear to me about midway through the ISU game that Ehlinger is the correct choice at QB. He seems more able to escape pressure - which is a must given the porous offensive line. I was mildly surprised we didn't see him come in at any point in the game Thursday even given how ugly it was becoming on offense. I expect Buechele will have a short leash this week.

I agree...and especially with Shane's ankle injury...

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